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The Surprising Truth About Backyard Chickens

By Tom Seest

Are Backyard Chickens a Health Risk?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

Chickens are a popular backyard pet, but there’s a serious health risk associated with them: Salmonella. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 15% of all cases of Salmonella from 1990-2014 were related to kissing, holding, or cuddling a chicken or a baby chick. In addition, 46% of cases involved keeping chickens inside the home or sleeping with them. As a result, it’s essential to follow best practices for keeping chickens in your backyard.

Are Backyard Chickens a Health Risk?

Are Backyard Chickens a Health Risk?

Are your beloved hens harboring harmful pathogens?

Although backyard chickens are an excellent way to get the fresh eggs you need, they do pose a risk of getting sick from salmonella. There are several ways to reduce your risk of catching the infection, including ensuring that your backyard poultry is sanitary and not exposed to other birds. According to the CDC, more than 200 people have contracted salmonella this year in 38 states, with two deaths. The number of cases is likely much higher, since many people get sick but recover without seeking medical attention or being tested.
Salmonella usually contracted from contaminated food or came into contact with infected droppings. The bacteria can be transferred to the mouth and infect the digestive system. Therefore, it is crucial to wash your hands often and change your clothes after handling chickens. In addition, it is important to buy chickens from reputable sources. Purchasing chickens certified by the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) is one way to ensure your poultry is free of Salmonella.
Backyard chickens can also be harmful to the health of young children. Young children are especially susceptible to illness from germs. They are not able to follow the proper precautions and will sometimes put things in their mouths without thinking. In order to reduce your risk of getting ill from backyard chickens, you should clean their nesting boxes regularly and discard dirty eggs. Also, don’t feed them moldy food or expired meat.
While many first-time poultry owners have no idea that their chickens carry germs, they should know that chickens do carry Salmonella. Many of these chickens will not show any symptoms of illness, but if they do, they will usually have watery diarrhea and a bluish comb.
Although backyard poultry are generally clean and hygienic, they can still carry the bacteria that can make you sick. When you handle your backyard poultry, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling them. Salmonella can be spread easily through contact. As long as your hands are clean, you should avoid getting sick from salmonella.
In order to prevent getting sick from salmonella from backyard chickens, you should avoid contact with the eggs of infected chickens. This can make you feel ill or even die. It is important to wash the eggs thoroughly after you collect them, and to wash them regularly to remove any traces of the bacteria. You should avoid touching their combs or feathers, as this can also introduce bacteria that can make you ill.
Infections with this bacteria are rare, but they can make you ill. The CDC reported that there were 212 cases of salmonella in 44 states in 2018. Although many people are affected, many recover without seeking medical attention.

Are your beloved hens harboring harmful pathogens?

Are your beloved hens harboring harmful pathogens?

Are Your Chickens Making You Sick?

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an organism that causes disease in birds. Infected birds produce bacterial toxins that can cause death. The disease is most often acquired through contact with animal wastes. Humans may acquire the disease by contact with contaminated birds or by eating their waste. In fact, a high percentage of birds are colonized by Yersinia spp.
Currently, the disease is rare in humans. Public health data from Russia show that Y. pseudotuberculosis has been reported since 1988. Infected individuals are more likely to be children than adults. In addition, certain strains of this pathogen are linked to FESLF, which is also known as Izumi fever in Japan.
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is caused by a pathogenic strain of Yersinia spp. and can infect chickens. Researchers have found that chickens can carry the pathogen in their intestines. In fact, the bacteria can even enter the intestines of domestic pigs.
If you have backyard chickens, you should take precautions to prevent the transmission of the disease. The best way to avoid this illness is to keep the animals isolated and wash your hands often after handling them. Moreover, you should not drink untreated water, which can contain bacteria. And if you live near a well, you should always check it for contamination.
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a rod-shaped bacteria that is found in backyard chickens. It belongs to the Yersiniaceae family and is a zoonotic pathogen. It is spread through infected food and tissue, and through cross-contamination of food or animals. Several outbreaks have been reported in laboratories, zoos, and animal-holding areas.
Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are two of the most common zoonoses in wild boars. They are both prevalent in the Basque Country, and the risk is based on the season and environment in which the wild boars live. However, the number of reported cases has declined since 2007.
The first report of the disease was published in 1889 by Pfeiffer, A., and later renamed as Pasteurella pseudotuberculosis. In the late 1930s, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was found in wild boars, and it was reclassified into Yersinia in 1965 by Smith and Thal.
This bacterium is found in seven bird species that originate from five bird families. However, it is unclear whether backyard chickens are a primary reservoir. In Finland, Yersinia enterocolitica was found sporadically in backyard chickens but was not associated with virulence plasmids. Only two strains of E. coli were found, one from a psittaciform bird and the other from a barnacle goose.
Infected birds can display no clinical symptoms, but they may serve as carriers of the bacteria and can spread the disease to other birds in the flock. While it is not common in backyard chickens, avian tuberculosis has become an increasing concern in the poultry industry. The disease may cause minor losses in adult birds, but the mortality rate may be low. It can cause heavy losses in pullets, especially on multiage sites with poor hygiene standards.

Are Your Chickens Making You Sick?

Are Your Chickens Making You Sick?

Have You Heard of Yersinia Enterica?

Yersinia enterica is a common bacterium found in many foods, including chicken and meat. It is also present in oysters, crabs, and raw milk. The bacterium is very resistant to antibiotics, including penicillin, ampicillin, and cephalotin. However, it does not always infect humans. Backyard chickens can carry Y. enterocolitica, a bacterium that can cause diarrhea, fever, and an array of other symptoms.
Infected individuals may experience abdominal pain, fever, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the bacterium can cause autoimmune reactions. Most cases occur in children under five years old. The infection generally lasts a few days to three weeks. It can be transmitted to humans through unpasteurized milk and contact with infected animals.
In order to cause a bacterium to enter an egg, it must contact an infected surface. A chicken’s oviduct contains a waxy layer that prevents bacteria from penetrating an egg. However, this barrier is broken by washing eggs. Bacteria can then travel through the oviduct to the egg.
The symptoms of Yersinia enterica food poisoning are typically mild and occur within two to twelve hours of ingestion. There may be no fever or other symptoms. Vomiting, diarrhea, and little or no diarrhea can also occur.
Although backyard chickens are safer than commercial poultry, they still carry the risk of making you sick. When in doubt, it is advisable to isolate the chicks for two weeks or until the symptoms appear. If you notice any of these symptoms, you should visit a vet. A qualified vet can take blood samples and determine the cause of the infection.
Although it is unlikely that Yersinia enterica from your backyard chickens will make you sick, it is important to consult with a doctor if you suspect you may have a salmonella infection. The risk of infection with this bacteria is high for those with weakened immune systems, so you should seek medical help if you suspect you may have been exposed to the bacteria.

Have You Heard of Yersinia Enterica?

Have You Heard of Yersinia Enterica?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.

 


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