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Egg-Citing Reasons to Raise Chickens In Ypsilanti

By Tom Seest

Are Backyard Chickens In Ypsilanti Worth the Cluck?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

Ypsilanti Township resident Jaclyn Baublit has been ticketed for keeping backyard chickens. After receiving a complaint from a neighbor, the Office of Community Standards inspected her property and found that her hens were making a noise and producing an odor. The ordinance officer then inspected her property and posted a notice explaining why she had violated the ordinance and ordered her to remove the chickens within seven days.

Are Backyard Chickens In Ypsilanti Worth the Cluck?

Are Backyard Chickens In Ypsilanti Worth the Cluck?

Are Backyard Chickens in Ypsilanti MI Worth the Inspection?

The Ypsilanti Township Board of Trustees is considering adopting an ordinance that would allow backyard chickens on single-family properties. Current law prohibits residents from keeping farm animals on smaller plots of land, but backyard chicken advocates have been pushing for a change. The Township Planning Commission recommended the ordinance be passed. The Board of Trustees will consider it at a future meeting.
The Ypsilanti Township Office of Community Standards received a complaint from a neighbor about backyard chickens. The neighbor claimed the chickens were causing a bad odor and noise. The chickens were found to be on a small parcel of land off Clark Road. An ordinance officer inspected the property and issued a $100 ticket. The ordinance states that the chickens must be removed within seven days.
While it is true that backyard chickens are allowed under the state’s Right to Farm Act, zoning ordinances do not allow them on residential properties under five acres. The Township Attorney Doug Winters plans to investigate the issue. If he finds the ordinance to be invalid, the city will need to change the ordinance.
The proposed legislation also requires that backyard chickens be housed in an enclosed pen and kept in the backyard. The proposed language also requires that the feed be stored properly. The council members also want to ensure that a chicken’s enclosure is protected from predators, including rodents.
To keep backyard chickens in Ypsilanti, MI, you would need to submit an application for zoning approval. The process typically takes two to five business days. After submitting your application, zoning staff will review it and contact you for an inspection.

Are Backyard Chickens in Ypsilanti MI Worth the Inspection?

Are Backyard Chickens in Ypsilanti MI Worth the Inspection?

What are the Benefits of Owning Backyard Chickens?

A proposed ordinance would limit residents to four backyard chickens per property. However, the proposed ordinance was quashed when the city council voted 3-2 against the measure. The council is expected to discuss the issue again on July 11 at a meeting. The proposed limit of four chickens per property is an arbitrary number that will frustrate the primary purpose of keeping backyard chickens: to produce eggs.
One way to change the law is to write to city council members and tell them to support the measure. Let them know you support the change, and ask them to put it on the agenda. If they say no, ask them to reconsider their position. Let them know you are a backyard chicken advocate, and that they should support your cause.
While the city council has not set a formal public hearing, they will entertain public comments. The council will meet at 6:00 p.m. on July 11 and will hear any concerns the community has about the ordinance. The ordinance does not grandfather current chicken owners. However, it would still impose the same limitations on current chicken owners.
Most cities permit backyard chickens. The maximum number of backyard chickens is usually three to eight. The first few years of backyard chicken egg-laying are the most productive years of raising a flock, but after that egg-laying starts to slow down. Ideally, you’d be able to have enough eggs for all of your family’s needs. Although many cities don’t allow roosters, backyard chickens don’t need a rooster to produce eggs.

What are the Benefits of Owning Backyard Chickens?

What are the Benefits of Owning Backyard Chickens?

Are Hens the Only Option in Ypsilanti?

Ypsilanti, Michigan, has recently approved an ordinance that would allow up to four hens on a property. In contrast, Chelsea, Michigan, rejected a citizens’ initiative to legalize backyard chickens. Silverio lives in a neat dwelling with a white picket fence. His chickens strutted around the neat white coop and pecked at the wire fence.
While Ypsilanti Township does not currently have an ordinance prohibiting backyard chickens, a group of residents is drafting language to amend the current law. According to the ordinance, it would not be legal to keep roosters in backyard chickens on a property under five acres. Baublit’s property is less than that size, and the township’s ordinance prohibits keeping roosters on less than five acres.
In a recent case, a resident of Ypsilanti Township fought to keep Waffle, the rooster, in her backyard. Although Waffle was a rooster and not a hen, the zoning official did not agree. While Kendra Wiedbusch’s argument was that Waffle was a pet, the magistrate ruled that Kendra Wiedbusch had violated the township ordinance.
The proposed ordinance would limit a property owner to four hens, with no roosters. In addition, a hen house under 25 square feet must be constructed at least twenty feet away from the property line and 40 feet away from another property. In addition, the hen house must be enclosed at night and waste from roosters must be composted. It would also prohibit the slaughter of chickens in residential zones.
A rooster is not necessarily a bad thing. They are actually helpful to your flock. They guard the hens and keep an eye on the surrounding area. They communicate with their hens by making low murmurs.

Are Hens the Only Option in Ypsilanti?

Are Hens the Only Option in Ypsilanti?

What Happens to Roosters in Ypsilanti?

A recently proposed ordinance limits backyard chickens to less than five acres, but advocates say it doesn’t go far enough. A hen house has to be no larger than 25 square feet, and it must be at least 20 feet from the property line and 40 feet from any neighboring buildings. The coop must also be secure at night.
The ordinance also limits the number of chickens a resident may have. It would also restrict the sex of the chickens. It would also prohibit slaughtering in a residential zone. However, many people in the township’s north side already keep backyard chickens. The township’s regulations are not too strict, and it only issues tickets when it receives a complaint.
The purpose of this ordinance is to promote safety and health for the residents. It would limit the number of roosters permitted on a property, and it would require that a property owner obtain permission from neighboring properties before keeping chickens. Furthermore, it would limit the number of roosting roosters that can be composted or disposed in the garbage. It would also require proper storage of animal feed and other waste materials.
The law would allow the keeping of up to five hens of any breed in an area of up to 1/4 acre in size. The owner of the coop must also reside on the property, and the hens cannot stray into other properties. The property must also have a building used for housing chickens.

What Happens to Roosters in Ypsilanti?

What Happens to Roosters in Ypsilanti?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.

 


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