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The Surprising Truth About Egg-Laying Noise

By Tom Seest

Are Backyard Chickens Loud When Laying Eggs?

Are Backyard Chickens Loud When Laying Eggs?

Are Backyard Chickens Loud When Laying Eggs?

How Loud Are Rooster Crows?

If you have ever been in a backyard where roosters regularly croak, you know that the noise can be quite loud. However, you might not know that the sound is also harmful to your ears. Studies show that prolonged exposure to sounds over 85 decibels can lead to temporary hearing loss. Thankfully, hens cluck at a lower decibel level.
Roosters crow at different times of the day, with the loudest sounds occurring at the early morning and late at night. Roosters generally crow to communicate with their flock or with other roosters. The noise can be so loud that it can be heard across a large area.
But it’s worth noting that roosters don’t chirp as loudly as other types of birds. In fact, some roosters can crow at more than 90 decibels! Although roosters are not as loud as other types of birds, they are often considered nuisances in neighborhoods and urban areas.
The sound pressure produced by roosters is 133.5 decibels when averaged across multiple vocalizations, with individual vocalizations reaching up to 136 decibels. Brackenbury recorded a rooster at a distance of a meter, and his results were comparable to 100 dB of sound pressure, which is about 27 times louder than the maximum power of human conversation.

How Loud Are Rooster Crows?

How Loud Are Rooster Crows?

Why Do Backyard Chickens Sing the Egg Song?

The answer to the question “Are backyard chickens noisy because of egg song” may be surprising. Despite their egg song, the birds aren’t really noisy. Usually, a hen starts singing its egg song when she leaves her nest. However, some hens don’t make this noise; they just pop out of the nest quietly.
Egg song is a celebratory song that hens make when they lay an egg. The song begins with a hen that has just laid an egg and is soon joined by the other hens in the area. The song may continue for a while and sometimes lasts for many minutes. Often, the hens will sing this song multiple times a day.
While backyard chickens are relatively quiet, they can become noisy at certain times. The most common time for this type of noise is at dawn, when they wake up and begin to prepare for the day. Occasionally, a hen will also begin an egg song to announce that she’s finished laying an egg. The noise is often between 60 and 70 decibels, although some hens may be noisier than this.
Having a flock of backyard chickens is a fun way to teach children about animals and nature. Many backyard chicken owners report spending more quality time with their children. But some may find the egg song irritating. If the egg song isn’t to your liking, you can choose not to have a rooster. There are also ways to raise chickens that do not use fertilized eggs.
When hens are in lay, they call out a song for several minutes. Older pullets will make gasping vocalizations, which chicken keepers consider celebratory and less sad. While these sounds may seem dramatic, backyard hens rarely experience pain.

Why Do Backyard Chickens Sing the Egg Song?

Why Do Backyard Chickens Sing the Egg Song?

Why Do Hens Sing Before Laying Eggs?

Backyard chickens can make some truly awful noises. Pre-egg squawking is one of the loudest, least-controllable noises. The sound varies with breed. Some chickens squawk just before laying an egg, while others squawk immediately after laying an egg.
If you’ve ever raised backyard chickens, you’ve experienced pre-egg squawking. You might also have noticed pacing and whining if you lock your flock in their coop at dusk. Chickens need routine, and they can sense if something’s not right.
Pre-egg squawking may be caused by pain. Young pullets may wheeze while laying eggs and may even bleed from the vent. Older hens that lay large eggs may squawk with gasps, though these sounds are more celebratory than sad. Although your backyard hens don’t necessarily experience pain, it’s still a nuisance to avoid causing them pain.
Egg-laying is a big deal for chickens. The sound of a pre-egg squawk is a way to alert other chickens and the entire flock. It also gives you a signal to collect the eggs. This means you can connect with your backyard flock.
Some chicken breeds are more prone to egg-squawking than others. The noise they make is often the result of built-up energy and boredom. A good way to distract your chickens from their squawking is to provide them with something to entertain themselves with.

Why Do Hens Sing Before Laying Eggs?

Why Do Hens Sing Before Laying Eggs?

Why Do Backyard Chickens Make So Much Noise During Egg Song?

Your chickens are going to make noises for a variety of reasons. This includes their desire to escape their coop or run and to eat pasture feed. While you can’t stop them from making noises, you can limit the amount of noise that they make. The noises they make are usually not offensive or overbearing.
Generally, backyard chickens are quieter than your neighbor’s dog, but some breeds are louder than others. The loudest breeds can reach decibel levels of 60-70 decibels at their loudest. For comparison, a barking dog can reach 90 decibels.
The noise that chickens make in the mornings is not loud enough to bother other animals. It is not a deafening noise and lasts for a short period of time. Hens also make clucking noises when they are excited. And roosters crow.
There are some breeds that are naturally quieter than others. Some of the quietest chickens include the Orpingtons, Brahmas, and Wyandottes. Other breeds, such as the Buff Orpington, are loud and noisy, but can be quieter than others.

Why Do Backyard Chickens Make So Much Noise During Egg Song?

Why Do Backyard Chickens Make So Much Noise During Egg Song?

What Can You Do to Quiet Your Backyard Chickens?

The first step to ensuring your backyard chickens’ quiet behavior is enriching their environment. Try hanging a cabbage on a string or giving them a box full of sawdust. Giving them toys is another great way to keep them occupied, which will help reduce the noise and crowing they make. Finally, select a breed of chicken that has a quiet temperament.
Although most backyard chicken breeds will make noise, there are some breeds that have been specifically bred to be quiet. Bantam chickens, which are smaller than standard-sized chickens, are known to be particularly quiet. However, any breed will make noise, as it is their way of communicating and interacting with one another.
Chickens will cluck throughout the day, and this noise is often due to both built-up energy and boredom. Providing your hens with activities that stimulate their minds and bodies is the best way to keep your hens quiet. While chickens enjoy foraging outside, small yards don’t offer a lot of foraging opportunities, so enriching your yard with a variety of objects and toys can help to keep your chickens calm and content.
A great way to make sure your chickens don’t make a lot of noise is to use a chicken call. If you have a neighbor or neighboring property, try bribing them with eggs to reduce noise and build tolerance. However, if that doesn’t work, you can always try other methods of training your chickens to be quiet.
There are some breeds that are naturally quiet, such as the Lavender Orpington. While these chickens aren’t recognized by the APA, they are a favorite among many homeowners. The roosters of these breeds are not noisy, which makes them an excellent choice for homeowners who want to enjoy their quiet chickens.

What Can You Do to Quiet Your Backyard Chickens?

What Can You Do to Quiet Your Backyard Chickens?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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