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Feathered Frenzy: the Truth About Choosing Chickens

By Tom Seest

Are Chickens a Risky Choice?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

If you are considering raising chickens, you might be worried about the potential for disease. You’ve probably heard about Salmonella, Campylobacter, E. coli, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. But do chickens really carry these diseases? Here are a few things you should know.

Are Chickens a Risky Choice?

Are Chickens a Risky Choice?

Are Your Chickens a Risk? Understanding Salmonella

A recent study has shown that raising chickens is linked to outbreaks of salmonella, a potentially fatal bacteria. The outbreaks in backyard poultry have prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to launch a public health investigation into the cause of the illness. Since 2001, there have been 212 outbreaks linked to backyard poultry. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that at least 34 people have been hospitalized, including five who died. Though these numbers seem small in comparison to the total number of illnesses caused by the bacteria, they have been growing. According to the CDC, Salmonella is a bacterium that usually spreads through contaminated foods. Every year, around 1.2 million people become sick with it, including 450 who die.
The bacteria that cause salmonella infections are often carried on the skin of young poultry. These bacteria can then be transmitted to humans through their hands and surfaces and even to people who do not have contact with the poultry. Children and people with weakened immune systems are especially susceptible to this infection.

Are Your Chickens a Risk? Understanding Salmonella

Are Your Chickens a Risk? Understanding Salmonella

Are You at Risk for Campylobacter from Raising Chickens?

It’s important to raise chickens that are resistant to Campylobacter, a bacteria that can cause food poisoning. Fortunately, a recent study identified genes that could help breed chickens with a lower risk of infection with Campylobacter. The research could also help improve food safety for consumers.
The bacteria’s main mode of transmission is via the chicken’s intestine. While the chicken will not develop any symptoms, the infection can be transmitted to humans when the chicken is slaughtered. In this case, Campylobacter can rupture the intestinal tract and leak into the meat, contaminating the meat. According to recent studies, about 20% to 30% of human infections are associated with poultry handling. Although poultry handling may be a factor in human infections, recent research has shown that decontamination during the rearing process can significantly reduce the bacteria’s prevalence.
Campylobacter can also spread to young chickens by fomites, insects, and contaminated feed. This bacteria can survive in commercial poultry litter for long periods, so it’s important to ensure the quality of the litter in your flock. Moreover, you should use non-chlorinated water for your poultry.

Are You at Risk for Campylobacter from Raising Chickens?

Are You at Risk for Campylobacter from Raising Chickens?

Can E. Coli Contamination Threaten Your Chicken Farm?

While you may be tempted to raise a few chickens for eggs, you should understand that there are risks associated with this. You should not eat undercooked eggs or raw meat from chickens. This can result in salmonella infections, so you must make sure that you cook your eggs thoroughly. Also, you must avoid touching the mouths of chickens, especially young chicks.
The most common cause of colibacillosis in poultry is a disease caused by avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a significant threat to the food chain. They are associated with improper use of antibiotics and inadequate hygienic practices. Using a RapID(tm) One System to identify isolates can help you detect any potential risks.
The test is simple and inexpensive. It allows the identification of potentially pathogenic strains of E. coli in brooders and hatcheries. If the test is positive, then the eggs or chicks are infected with this bacteria.

Can E. Coli Contamination Threaten Your Chicken Farm?

Can E. Coli Contamination Threaten Your Chicken Farm?

What is the Silent Threat of Mycoplasma Gallisepticum?

Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg) is a bacterium that can infect poultry. The disease can cause a range of illnesses in chickens and turkeys, depending on the strain. The infection can spread horizontally and vertically from bird to bird, as well as indirectly through inanimate vectors. While antibiotics can suppress the clinical signs of infection in chickens and turkeys, they do not completely eradicate it. However, these antibiotics can be used to treat individual flocks that have been infected.
The symptoms of Mycoplasma gallisepticum include watery eyes, tracheal rales, nasal discharge, and coughing. In some chickens, infection can also lead to weight loss, as well as reduced egg production in adult laying birds. The infection is most common in young chickens and roosters.

What is the Silent Threat of Mycoplasma Gallisepticum?

What is the Silent Threat of Mycoplasma Gallisepticum?

Are You at Risk for Avian Flu from Raising Chickens?

The highly pathogenic form of avian flu is extremely dangerous for chickens and other poultry. The disease can spread quickly and can cause severe disease and death. It can also spread to people in close contact with infected birds, so people need to be cautious when handling chickens and other domestic poultry.
Avian flu has spread to commercial poultry operations as well as backyard flocks, with the disease killing nearly 22 million chickens and other birds in recent years. It is most common in commercial chicken flocks, but backyard flocks are especially susceptible. In the United States, the disease has been detected in several states. A Tyson facility in Kentucky recently euthanized 240,000 broiler chickens, which was likely spread by wild birds.
The recent outbreak of avian flu in the United States is the most serious since the 2015 outbreak. The 2015 outbreak of HPAI killed nearly 50 million chickens and turkeys, with many more being killed because of the disease. It spreads through the migratory route of wild birds. The avian flu virus is dangerous for backyard chickens, and even more so when confined to coops.

Are You at Risk for Avian Flu from Raising Chickens?

Are You at Risk for Avian Flu from Raising Chickens?

Are Your Chickens Posing a Threat? Uncovering Innate Behaviors

Chickens can become extremely dangerous if you don’t understand their natural instincts. They have a strong motivation to hunt, forage, and explore. As they grow older, these behaviors can become more extreme and may even lead to cannibalism. Luckily, you can avoid some of these issues by educating yourself about the behaviors chickens display naturally.
For example, chickens are highly social animals. This means they have social hierarchies and often fight for position among their flocks. Some chickens may fight each other over food and water, particularly if they become bored. Broody hens may also be particularly aggressive, as they may be protective of their chicks.

Are Your Chickens Posing a Threat? Uncovering Innate Behaviors

Are Your Chickens Posing a Threat? Uncovering Innate Behaviors

Are You Taking the Necessary Precautions for Your Flock’s Safety?

Biosecurity of raising chickens is an important part of backyard poultry management. There are a number of ways to ensure biosecurity. One of the most important ways is to isolate your flock. This will prevent infection from other flocks. Other biosecurity measures include traffic control and sanitation. Several FAO reports have provided recommendations for backyard poultry settings. These recommendations vary by type of backyard poultry, sector, and geographic location.
Poor hygiene can cause the spread of disease. In fact, the disease can live for weeks or even months in a dirty coop or run. A dirty coop or run will attract flies and other animals that can spread diseases. To avoid these diseases, make sure to clean your coop and run thoroughly.
Biosecurity is an important part of backyard poultry production. The National Farmers’ Union and the USDA publish guidelines for proper biosecurity. The National Avian On-Farm Biosecurity Standard encourages poultry producers to implement farm-specific biosecurity protocols and On-Farm Food Safety programs. Moreover, the Poultry Service Industry Biosecurity Guide provides guidelines for service sector personnel to limit the spread of disease in poultry production.

Are You Taking the Necessary Precautions for Your Flock's Safety?

Are You Taking the Necessary Precautions for Your Flock’s Safety?

Can Proper Care and Precautions Make Raising Chickens Safe?

There are several ways to minimize the risks of raising chickens. These include proper hygiene and using gloves whenever handling chickens. In addition, raising chickens in an enclosed area protects them from predators. It also makes egg collection easier. In addition, buying chickens from participating hatcheries can also help reduce the risk of disease transmission.
Washing your hands after handling chickens is also very important. This is because chicken droppings and other materials can carry pathogens. You should always wash your hands thoroughly and teach young children to do so as well. Children should also be supervised when handling poultry and should not handle them without an adult. Also, children should not handle live poultry in the kitchen or in the food preparation area. Finally, make sure to thoroughly cook the eggs you collect from the chickens.
Another way to reduce the risk of raising chickens is to ensure they have free access to water. Chickens need water at least every 10 hours. For this, make sure they have access to water by using heated water bowls. Also, keep electrical cords off the floor and out of the reach of the chickens. Water spills and leaks can cause increased moisture in the coop and can cause health problems.

Can Proper Care and Precautions Make Raising Chickens Safe?

Can Proper Care and Precautions Make Raising Chickens Safe?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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