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Cracking the Profit Potential Of Raising Chickens

By Tom Seest

Are Eggs From Raising Chickens Profitable?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

When raising chickens for eggs, you need to understand the costs and benefits associated with the business. These include the costs of raising your chickens and selling your eggs at the farmer’s market. There are also trade-offs to consider. Here are some tips to help you make the right choice.

Are Eggs From Raising Chickens Profitable?

Are Eggs From Raising Chickens Profitable?

Are the Expenses of Raising Chickens Worth the Delicious Rewards?

The first costs of raising chickens for eggs are the initial costs associated with purchasing and setting up the coop. Depending on the breed and age of your birds, the cost will vary. On average, a small flock will cost anywhere from $200 to $400. However, the cost can be much lower if you get rescue hens, which are fully grown and have been “spent” in the industrial poultry world.
Feed costs are also important to consider. Depending on the breed of chickens you buy, you may end up paying between $12 and $25 per chicken. The cost of feed will also depend on the age of the chickens. Older birds will be more expensive because they have been raised to that age and are already sexed. On average, a chick will eat seven to fifteen kilograms of feed. The cost of a chick starter is around $1.70 per kilogram.
A backyard chicken can lay between four to twelve eggs per week, but it is important to keep in mind that the chicken needs ample sunlight. Without adequate light, they may stop producing during the winter. Commercial egg farmers use lights in their coops. These lights will require an ongoing electric bill.
Laying hens are typically sold at 16 to 22 weeks, depending on the breed. While prices vary, laying hens cost only a few dollars more than pullets. This cost is the most reoccurring cost of raising chickens for eggs. However, once you’ve got them, you will find raising them a rewarding experience and even make money. Just remember to have a plan before you start coop-raising.
Buying fertilized eggs will cost you anywhere from $1 to $2 each. Then, you’ll need to incubate the eggs and tend to the chicks. The cost of an incubator can reach $100 or more. The cost of feeding 30 chickens is about $6 a week.
Depending on the breed of chickens and the location of your coop, raising chickens for eggs can be a great experience. It is an enjoyable hobby, and the eggs you produce will be more nutritious and delicious than those from the store. Just be sure to check with local regulations to ensure that your coop is in compliance with the laws.
Besides the up-front costs of raising chickens for eggs, there are many recurring costs of keeping hens. It’s best to plan ahead for all these expenses and make sure you’re able to meet them on a consistent basis. However, the rewards of raising your own chickens may make the investment worthwhile.
Incubators cost $100 or more and require a lot of time. You’ll also need bedding for your coop and nesting boxes. Luckily, this can be inexpensive if you reuse salvaged cardboard boxes or salvaged five-gallon buckets. You’ll also need to purchase chicken food from a feed store.

Are the Expenses of Raising Chickens Worth the Delicious Rewards?

Are the Expenses of Raising Chickens Worth the Delicious Rewards?

Are Farmer’s Market Eggs Worth the Investment?

When you’re considering raising chickens for egg production, you need to determine the costs involved. You’ll need to account for time and gas expenses, plus the costs of building a coop and supplies. You’ll also have to consider the price of feed and supplements. The final price of your eggs should reflect the total cost of raising and selling your chickens.
The price of a dozen eggs can range from $3.00 to $5.00, depending on the type and size of eggs. It’s recommended that you sell your eggs at around $5 to $8 per dozen, depending on your location and market. You can charge more if you’d like to sell organic eggs.
Another important consideration is the number of chickens you keep. Even if you only plan to sell a few dozen eggs per day, you’ll need to purchase enough feed for dozens of hens to be profitable. A small-scale operation may not support the expenses.
Egg selling at the farmer’s market is one of the most lucrative methods of home-based chicken production. The average American consumes 259 eggs per year, and there is an increasing demand for organic and all-natural eggs. While many people won’t pay that much for a dozen eggs, you’ll find that a larger number of people want healthy, nutritious egg products from homegrown chickens.
Developing a customer base is critical to success. You should research the local farmers’ market for eggs and consider the possibility of becoming part of a local CSA program. In addition, you’ll need to research local egg laws. Contact your county extension agent or state poultry specialist for information on specific regulations. This is a good idea for food safety reasons. If you’re serious about your business, you’ll need to set prices that are fair and allow you to make a profit.
Prices for eggs vary in different regions. Currently, conventional white eggs are selling for around $2 a dozen in the Midwest. Prices for this type of egg are typically highest during early spring and right before Easter. Prices fall during the summer and fall but rise during the winter holiday seasons as the demand for fresh eggs increases. If you’re looking to make a profit from egg sales, a higher price is best.
In addition to the cost of the chickens, you’ll also need to pay the wages of your workers. The average cost of raising a flock of chickens is between $1 and $5 per bird. This amount will increase if you raise a larger flock of chickens.
Depending on the state law, you will also need a license to sell your eggs. This is important if you plan to sell eggs at the farmer’s market. Some states even require USDA inspection of your chicken coop.

Are Farmer's Market Eggs Worth the Investment?

Are Farmer’s Market Eggs Worth the Investment?

Are the Benefits of Raising Chickens for Eggs Worth the Effort?

There are several trade-offs involved in raising chickens for eggs. First of all, you need to make sure you have the infrastructure to care for a flock of chickens. Second, you’ll have to spend months raising your pullets. Third, every pullet will come with a cockerel. The average egg hatches are 50% female and 50% male. Finally, you will have to deal with males; the cost of raising them is usually borne by the hatchery or breeder.
Next, it’s important to understand the life cycle of your hens. They begin laying eggs when they are five or six months old, and the rate decreases as they age. A good production hen will lay about six eggs a week at its peak, but the rate will drop off over time. This is particularly true during seasons with shorter days. Hens need 12-14 hours of daylight to continue laying, so it’s crucial to provide them with a light bulb in their coop.

Are the Benefits of Raising Chickens for Eggs Worth the Effort?

Are the Benefits of Raising Chickens for Eggs Worth the Effort?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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