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Feathered Friends: the Ultimate Guide to Raising Backyard Chickens

By Tom Seest

Are You Ready for Backyard Chickens?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

There are many things to consider when buying backyard chickens. There are starter pullets, layer chicks, egg-layer chicks, and growers. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages. Let us explore some of them. Starter pullets are the easiest to raise and care for. They are also inexpensive.

Are You Ready for Backyard Chickens?

Are You Ready for Backyard Chickens?

Are These Starter Pullets the Perfect Addition to Your Flock?

Starter pullets are the ideal choice for those who are starting out as backyard chicken farmers. This type of chicken has all of the necessary characteristics to become a good layer or a chicken that lays eggs. When they reach about 20 weeks of age, layer chickens are ready to start laying eggs. A few factors should be considered before buying a new flock, including the type of backyard chickens you want to keep.
First, you will want to find the right feed for starter pullets. You’ll want to provide them with a diet rich in protein. You should also make sure that they’ll get plenty of fresh water. A typical starter feed has about 21% protein. To ensure a smooth transition, mix a starter-grower feed with layer feed for about four or five days. Many hens will adjust to the mix without noticing a difference, but others can take a couple of weeks to adjust to their new diet.
Starter pullets for backyard chicken farming are a great choice if you’re looking for a cheap and easy way to raise your own chickens. These chickens are young female hens that have yet to begin laying eggs. As a bonus, these chicks won’t require the same amount of daily care that a hen does. Pullets also don’t need an incubator, and can be placed into a coop as soon as they arrive.

Are These Starter Pullets the Perfect Addition to Your Flock?

Are These Starter Pullets the Perfect Addition to Your Flock?

Are Your Chickens Getting the Best Nutrition?

Layers are the backbone of any backyard flock, and they can lay 200 eggs or more per year. Though the recent focus on colored eggs may have you overlooking this breed, it is important to remember that brown eggs have their own value. It is likely that many people have never seen a brown egg before, and the recent trend toward colored eggs has made brown eggs a little hard to find. White eggs, on the other hand, were popularized by an industrialized farming society. White egg-laying chickens require less feed and are more efficient for large-scale production.
If you are looking for a backyard chicken breed with a friendly demeanor, you may want to consider raising a Rhode Island Red. This breed is popular due to its hardiness and ability to lay a large number of eggs each year. It is also one of the friendliest breeds of chicken. You can also consider Isa Brown chickens, which are great for egg production. They begin laying as early as 16 weeks old and can be raised from chicks. Isa Brown chickens are another good choice and a heavy layer with 280 eggs a year.
Healthy chickens are bright-eyed and active. They will scratch, peck, dust, and move around throughout the day. You can tell if a chicken is healthy by the color of its feathers and their eyes. They will also talk and sing throughout the day. Moreover, their droppings will be firm, grayish brown, and have white urine salts. A healthy chicken will also have a thick layer of droppings that has a light brown color and foam.

Are Your Chickens Getting the Best Nutrition?

Are Your Chickens Getting the Best Nutrition?

Are These Egg-Layers the Best Choice for Your Flock?

One of the most popular egg-layers for backyard chickens is the Leghorn chicken. These beautiful birds lay around 280 to 320 extra-large eggs per year. They are available in a variety of colors and are hardy and tolerant of confinement. They are also excellent foragers and do not damage your garden.
The White Leghorn chicken is the most common breed used for commercial egg production. They lay a high percentage of eggs, but they are very small and not good meat chickens. In backyard chicken farming, you can choose any of the following breeds: Ancona, Barnevelder, White Leghorn, Jersey Giant, and Rhode Island Red. These are all good choices for backyard chickens, and they are a great choice for beginners.
If you want a variety of colors and patterns, you can try different breeds. Some of these hens can lay up to 250 eggs a year. They take about 24 hours to lay each egg. The average chicken egg production is a little less during the winter season when the days are shorter and the temperature rises. Egg production can also decrease in the summer and fall due to the molting process.
Another popular breed is the Rhode Island Red, which has large, brown eggs. This breed was named for the state that influenced its development. The Rhode Island Red is a hardy and friendly bird that makes excellent layers. These breeds are often used for hybrid purposes.

Are These Egg-Layers the Best Choice for Your Flock?

Are These Egg-Layers the Best Choice for Your Flock?

Are Composters the Secret to Happy and Healthy Backyard Chickens?

Backyard chickens are a great source of organic debris, and you don’t need a huge yard to make compost. Chickens love to scratch in things that attract worms, flies, and other biota. This organic debris can then be used for gardening. It’s also a great way to recycle your yard waste while benefiting other backyard homesteads.
There are two basic styles of composters. Stationary composters require a running area around 20 feet long and half that width. The second type is a mobile system where you transfer piles of compost rather than an entire run. In this system, you’ll still have to rake the pile, but the chickens will be doing most of the work.
A chicken compost pile should be a mix of carbon and nitrogen materials. It’s important to use a variety of materials to avoid creating a slimy mat that won’t decompose. If you’ve got grass clippings, mix them with other materials, like kitchen scraps and shredded newspaper. The hens will eat these items and they will mix them with their own manure.
Compost piles are usually ready to use after four to five months. They should be dark and crumbly and have a strong, earthy smell. Make sure that you keep your compost pile away from chickens, however, since the strong smell of decomposing food can attract a variety of predators.

Are Composters the Secret to Happy and Healthy Backyard Chickens?

Are Composters the Secret to Happy and Healthy Backyard Chickens?

Light Up Your Flock: The Perfect Lighting Solution for Your Backyard Chickens

A utility lamp for backyard chickens can extend the amount of time your flock can lay eggs. Installing a light can give your flock up to four extra months of daily production. Chickens are nocturnal creatures, so you must slowly introduce extra light to their environment. It is advisable to use a light source that is not near water or where it could be damaged by water droplets.
In poultry houses, the most common type of lamp used is an incandescent bulb. It produces light by passing an electrical current through a thin filament made of tungsten. This filament glows because of the high temperature, and the light produced by this lamp covers the entire visible spectrum. A poorly maintained lamp can also reduce light intensity, which can be stressful for chickens.
Another useful utility lamp for backyard chickens is a YINGHAO red LED deterrent light. It comes in a four-pack and has two bulbs to cover a 360-degree space. It can be placed near the coop to keep predators away, but the light is not bright enough to harm the birds. A good lamp can help to increase the number of eggs your flock can produce.
If you’re unsure of the type of light your hens need, you can purchase a compact fluorescent bulb with a timer. This will help ensure that the light is on for a minimum of 15 hours per day and won’t disturb the chickens while they are laying. During the winter, a compact fluorescent bulb can provide sufficient light to give your flock 15 hours of daylight each day. This will enhance egg production during the shorter days of winter.

Light Up Your Flock: The Perfect Lighting Solution for Your Backyard Chickens

Light Up Your Flock: The Perfect Lighting Solution for Your Backyard Chickens

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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