We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Backyard Chickens.

backyard-chicken-news-logo-500-x-500
Please Share With Your Friends and Family

Worms: a Hidden Threat to Your Backyard Chickens

By Tom Seest

Are Your Backyard Chickens At Risk for Worms?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

Chicken deworming can be done as a routine procedure or when the worm burden is high. There are veterinary clinics and diagnostic labs that will evaluate a flock’s worm burden and recommend the best course of action. The approach that is best for your flock depends on many factors, including the size of your flock, whether your birds are kept in a coop or in pasture, and the history of intestinal worms.

Are Your Backyard Chickens At Risk for Worms?

Are Your Backyard Chickens At Risk for Worms?

Are Cecal Worms a Threat to Your Backyard Chickens?

Cecal worms can be quite common in backyard chickens. These worms live in the ceca, which are pouches that branch off the intestine. These are also where your chickens produce their stinky poop. They are very easy to see in the chicken droppings. Fortunately, cecal worms do not pose any significant threat to the health of your flock, and they cannot be transmitted to humans. If you find your flock infected with cecal worms, you can treat your chickens with fenbendazole.
Cecal worms do not pose any clinical problems to your chickens, but they do carry the protozoan Histomonas meleagridis, which causes Blackheads. Luckily, Blackhead is not always fatal to chickens, but successful treatment of cecal worms will help prevent the disease.
Treatment for cecal worms in chickens is largely the same as for gapeworm and threadworm. A worm medication called Valbazen can be given orally, depending on the weight of the chickens. You can also try using a Medicated Premixture (MP) to treat your flock.
The best way to prevent chicken worms is to keep the environment as clean as possible. A clean and dry environment will reduce the chance of your chickens contracting cecal worms. Cecal worms and eyeworms can be a problem in your chickens. Eye worm is a form of roundworm that occurs primarily in the southern United States. It is a white, thin worm that attaches itself to the chicken’s eye membrane. When chickens develop eye worms, they are extremely uncomfortable and may even lose their sight.
This condition can affect chickens of all ages. It can affect the egg production, growth, and overall health. It can also lead to the loss of feathers. Also, it can cause lesions on the skin. Eventually, it may lead to a serious disease in older chickens.
Once infected, chickens may become lethargic and fail to thrive. To treat the disease, chicken owners can add wormers to their chickens’ water. They should be added every three months. The amount of wormer you administer depends on the size of your flock.
The symptoms of cecal worm in backyard chickens can be spotted easily. The worms, which are approximately one inch long, inhabit the windpipe of chickens and feed on the micro-blood vessels. The chickens’ trachea is especially vulnerable because it is so small. If your chickens begin to cough, you may notice a red fork-shaped worm that is inserted in its trachea. In severe cases, the chickens can even choke to death.
Chickens can also contract cecal worms if their drinking water is contaminated. This can be prevented by providing hygienic drinking stations. In addition, a chicken owner should focus on keeping the coop and hen house dry. Using specialized chicken feeders can also reduce the spread of cecal worms.
For backyard chickens, worm prevention is essential. The use of medicinal and natural products can prevent parasitic worms in the poultry. These medications are a great way to kill any existing worms that may be causing your flock’s health problems. In addition to using medicinal and natural products, you can also use garlic to discourage worms from infesting your flock.
While chemical dewormers can control cecal worms, these methods only provide temporary relief. In some cases, worms may become resistant to treatment if your chickens continue to eat their diets without supplementation. It is also important to use clean water in the chicken coop and run to keep the environment worm-free.
The best way to avoid the risk of chicken tapeworms is to thoroughly clean your chicken’s coop, runs, and other equipment. This will keep these worms out of your backyard flock. Infection with tapeworms can cause weight loss and anemia in your chickens.
A heavy roundworm infestation can lead to reduced nutrient absorption, intestinal blockage, and even death. Infection with this worm can also cause your chickens to lose their appetite and produce fewer eggs than normal. The symptoms of heavy roundworms are often vague and can be difficult to diagnose. Infected birds may also show pale facial features and reduced activity. Their droppings may also contain adult worms.

Are Cecal Worms a Threat to Your Backyard Chickens?

Are Cecal Worms a Threat to Your Backyard Chickens?

Are Your Backyard Chickens at Risk for Eye Worms?

One of the most common problems that can infest backyard chickens is an infection from an eye worm. Chickens infected with eye worms scratch at their eyes constantly, which can cause infection and even blindness. Chickens affected by eye worms need special medication from a veterinarian. Infected cockroaches are a common source of the parasite, as well as black birds and pigeons.
The symptoms of eye worms in chickens include thickened material in the eye, which may appear on the feathers of the bird. The eye can also become inflamed and swollen. In addition, a bird may scratch its face constantly, mimicking the signs of respiratory diseases like bronchitis. To treat the eye worm in chickens, the first step is to identify the type of worm and treatment. Infected chickens must be isolated from other chickens so that they do not get infected.
To prevent the spread of eye worms in chickens, it is important to maintain the cleanliness of your chicken coop and poultry housing facilities. You should remove any roaches or other insects that might have infected your hens. Also, try to limit the amount of contact between your chickens and wild birds. Chickens can also spread the infection from one chicken to another through their bedding, poop, and feed.
Besides eye worms, other possible sources of infection in backyard chickens include cockroaches and other worms. Infestations in the poultry eye can make it difficult for the chicken to see properly, and they may even go blind. Fortunately, there are worm treatments available that can prevent the infestation from progressing to the next stage.
The symptoms of an infestation vary, and they may be difficult to detect without a microscope. Infected birds may scratch their eyes and rub them with their feathers. They may also be weak and lose weight. Their droppings will be loose and may even be bloody. The worms can also cause anemia. Infected chickens may also show signs of lethargy, a pale egg yolk, or a prominent keel bone.
Treatments should be given at regular intervals. Young chickens are particularly susceptible to infection because they have not developed a natural defense against them. Fortunately, worms are curable, and treatment intervals can be extended as the chickens mature and become stronger. However, be sure to use worm-control drugs with a worm-repelling effect.
If you’re not sure which treatment to use, veterinarians will most likely prescribe a product known as Vet RX. This wormicide is easy to use and is effective against many types of worms. Vet RX also works well for respiratory illnesses and CRD, and scaly leg mites in poultry. It is a good idea to keep a bottle in your poultry first aid kit. A drench can also be used.
Besides being a threat to backyard chickens, worms can cause malnutrition and render chickens more vulnerable to infectious agents. Routine worming is important to protect your chickens from this problem and boost their overall health. Taking the time to treat chickens at a young age can enhance their immune systems and improve their well-being. Levamisole, for example, is an effective medication for young chickens, and ivermectin and moxidectin are both good worm-killers.
Fortunately, the eyeworm does not typically cause any symptoms in chickens, but it can affect turkeys. While it is not common in backyard chickens, it can lead to a fatal condition. Fortunately, most chickens will not show any signs of this disease, but it is best to treat affected chickens immediately.

Are Your Backyard Chickens at Risk for Eye Worms?

Are Your Backyard Chickens at Risk for Eye Worms?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


Please Share With Your Friends and Family