We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Backyard Chickens.

backyard-chicken-news-logo-500-x-500
Please Share With Your Friends and Family

Keeping Chickens In Massachusetts: What You Need to Know

By Tom Seest

Can I Keep Chickens In Massachusetts?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

There is no specific number of chickens that Massachusetts residents can have, but there are several restrictions. Many areas require a permit, and there are some that do not. Depending on where you live, you may be able to keep up to four roosters.

Can I Keep Chickens In Ma?

Can I Keep Chickens In Ma?

Is Keeping Backyard Chickens Prohibited In Massachusetts?

The city of Worcester does not allow backyard chickens, even though many of its comparable-sized cities have allowed poultry. Worcester has strict regulations that control noise and odors. It also limits the number of hens allowed. But there are ways to make backyard chickens legal in your city.
Backyard chickens are a great way to get your hands on fresh, nutritious food. And, since they eat bugs, ticks, and weeds, they help control pests in your yard. They also help reduce your carbon footprint. If you live in a city, you might want to consider keeping chickens as a pet.
Although backyard chickens may not be permitted in Massachusetts, many cities and towns are considering regulating their use. This would ensure that local food sources are available at a low price and give homeowners more control over synthetic hormones and poultry feed with chemical fertilizers. In addition, many Boston-area municipalities have traditionally allowed backyard chickens and other livestock.
In Massachusetts, there are two types of regulations for backyard chickens: the number of hens and roosters allowed. Some towns have a rooster limit, while others don’t. If you live in a city with strict regulations, it may be best to keep them indoors. In addition to having a limit on the number of hens you can keep, you must also post a license notice.
If your permit has been denied, you may have to pay a fine. The board of health can suspend your permit, or revoke your chickens altogether if you continue violating the rules.

Is Keeping Backyard Chickens Prohibited In Massachusetts?

Is Keeping Backyard Chickens Prohibited In Massachusetts?

Is A Permit Required to Raise Chickens In Massachusetts?

While a permit is not required to have backyard chickens in Massachusetts, some restrictions apply. You must keep the chickens in a properly constructed structure, and they must be kept on your property. The structure must be secure against predators, and it must not encroach on neighboring properties. The coop must be at least 50 feet from a dwelling and 50 feet from a well. In addition, you must provide them with fresh food and water and keep them out of harm’s way.
The Board of Health has the authority to suspend or deny your application. You should contact the Board of Health to learn more about your options. If you are approved, you can keep up to four chickens. The permit must be renewed every five years. You can apply for a new permit in Massachusetts by following the proper procedures and submitting the required documents.
The regulations vary by municipality, but in general, you must have a coop and run built within 100 feet of your house. It is also important to maintain your coop and keep out rodents. For your chickens’ safety, make sure your coop is built properly.
There are restrictions in place in many towns and cities, so it is important to check with your town’s local by-laws before starting a backyard farm. You do not want to risk getting fined or having your structure torn down because of a violation. So, make sure you research the requirements in your area before you make any plans to start raising backyard chickens.
In some towns, you will need a permit for your chickens. You must fill out the application form, sign it, and submit it to the Health Department. The Health Department will inspect your property and check it for compliance with regulations before issuing a permit.

Is A Permit Required to Raise Chickens In Massachusetts?

Is A Permit Required to Raise Chickens In Massachusetts?

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Chickens In Massachusetts?

Although there are no laws in Massachusetts that prohibit the keeping of backyard chickens, there are some local restrictions that you should be aware of. First, you need to obtain a license from the Board of Health. Once you have a license, you can keep a certain number of hens or roosters on your property. The license must be renewed annually and posted prominently on your property.
Backyard chickens can be kept on two-acre or larger lots. A fenced-in area is required. This fenced-in area should be at least 20 feet away from any dwelling or structure. In addition, the state of Massachusetts does not have a zoning ordinance that prohibits the keeping of backyard chickens.
In addition, some communities do not allow roosters. This is especially true in towns where there is a small population. Some towns have a limit of nine chickens, while others may have no limits. The Uxbridge Board of Health issued letters to the owner of the noisy fowl and ultimately took the matter to court. As a result, the Uxbridge Health Department warns homeowners against keeping roosters. Besides being noisy and messy, roosters may annoy neighbors.
Massachusetts allows the keeping of up to 10 fowl on lots smaller than 40,000 square feet. You must have a permit to keep your chickens, and you must maintain the coop structure within a certain distance from your neighbors’ properties. The annual permit cost is $10, which must be paid before you can raise your hens. If you want a larger flock, you will need to consider purchasing a license.
Keeping chickens on your property is not prohibited in Massachusetts. You must follow city ordinances for their care and safety. The henhouse and attached pen must be enclosed and protected from wild migratory birds. You must also be sure to fence the area around your chickens so that they cannot escape.

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Chickens In Massachusetts?

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Chickens In Massachusetts?

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Roosters In Massachusetts?

There’s no limit on how many roosters a Massachusetts resident can have. However, there are some restrictions. Roosters can’t be kept within 1,500 feet of a residential dwelling, school, church, or business. The number of roosters a Massachusetts resident can have depends on their area of residence. If you are living in Massachusetts and are interested in having backyard chickens, the first step is to contact your local town officials.
While Massachusetts allows you to keep as many hens as you want, there are some towns that restrict the number of roosters you can have. In Some towns, it’s illegal to keep more than six hens in a single coop. In other towns, there are no limits.
Some towns prohibit roosters altogether, while others allow roosters without a permit. However, in towns with strict noise ordinances, you’ll need to have a plan to manage the manure. In addition, if your neighbor complains about your hens, you could be asked to remove them.
In Lancaster, PA, roosters are illegal, but you’re still allowed to raise up to six hens in a one-acre plot. But if your neighbors complain about the noise, you can apply for a special permit. In this case, the Planning Board will take into account the proximity to neighboring homes and noise.
Backyard chickens in Massachusetts are permitted to have up to 15 hens. However, you must keep them in a pen that’s at least fifty feet from neighboring dwellings. Massachusetts’ Department of Agricultural Resources has a list of participating poultry sources. If you plan to keep more than three hens, you must get a Certificate of Inspection from the Animal Control Officer’s office, located at 17 Fowlers Lane. The certificate is valid for three years and can be renewed.

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Roosters In Massachusetts?

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Roosters In Massachusetts?

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Hens In Massachusetts?

Massachusetts doesn’t have a statewide limit on backyard chickens. In most cases, you can keep as many as you like, but some cities have their own restrictions. Some municipalities prohibit roosters, while others restrict the number of chickens to four. These regulations vary from city to city, so it’s best to check with your local government to make sure you’re not violating any restrictions.
Backyard chickens in Massachusetts are allowed in residential districts, but they need to be kept in an enclosure that is at least 30 feet from other houses. In many cases, there’s no limit on the number of chickens per household. In other towns, you’re allowed to keep three to five chickens, but you’ll have to be careful not to annoy your neighbors.
Chickens are allowed on lots with less than one-fourth of an acre. However, you must have a license from the Board of Health before keeping your chickens. If you’re in Bourne, you can keep two hens on a half-acre of land. There’s also a limit on the number of roosters per lot, so keep a copy of the license somewhere visible on your property.
In Maynard and Milford, Massachusetts, there is no limit on the number of backyard chickens you can have. However, you’ll need a permit in most other communities. Some cities, like Portland, have regulations that prohibit roosters. Others have no restrictions, and you may even keep as many as six hens in your backyard.
You should check with your town’s city or town government before starting your own backyard chicken farm. After all, you don’t want to have to worry about getting fined or having to move your chickens.

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Hens In Massachusetts?

Is There A Limit On the Number Of Hens In Massachusetts?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


Please Share With Your Friends and Family