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Washington NW Serama Club: a Lone Poultry Show?

By Tom Seest

Can the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone In the Poultry Show?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

The Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show is an annual event that combines the excitement of a poultry show with the educational value of learning about the birds. This show features a variety of different classes, including Commercial Egg Production Hybrid Layer Class, Feeder Pig Barrows and Gilts, and Breeding Pigs.

Can the Washington Nw Serama Club Stand Alone In the Poultry Show?

Can the Washington Nw Serama Club Stand Alone In the Poultry Show?

How Does the Washington NW Serama Club’s Crowing Contest Measure Up?

The Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show features a Crowing Contest. The rooster that crows the most times in a 15-minute period will win. The winner will be awarded a prize, which will be displayed in the showroom.
This contest is designed to help educate the public about poultry, care, and handling. Youth exhibitors are eligible to compete in the competition. The judges score the animals on knowledge, handling, exhibitor, and animal. Youth exhibitors must prepare the animals prior to the show, and each contestant must show a different animal.
Poultry meat pens must consist of at least four birds and the birds must weigh at least four pounds. Turkey market projects can be any breed but must be 16-24 weeks old and weigh at least 16 pounds. After the show, poultry exhibitors must check their birds and remove any feeders and waterers.
Applicants must be six years old or older as of January 1st. Youth exhibitors may not enter their birds into the open division. All classes will be judged on a point system, and awards will be given according to the number of points earned. Each exhibitant must wear a neatly-fitted long-sleeved shirt when competing.

How Does the Washington NW Serama Club's Crowing Contest Measure Up?

How Does the Washington NW Serama Club’s Crowing Contest Measure Up?

How Can the Washington NW Serama Club’s Hybrid Layer Class Revolutionize Commercial Egg Production?

Commercial egg production hybrids are crossbred chickens with different breeds and genetics. These hybrids are typically sold by hatcheries and are primarily used for egg production. Unlike Open Poultry, which allows any breed of bird to be shown, exhibitors in this class are limited to one entry. There are no premiums earned in this class, but there is a People’s Choice Award. In addition, hybrids may be exhibited by youth exhibitors.
This event is sanctioned by the American Poultry Association (APA), and exhibitors must meet specific requirements to participate. The entry deadline is Monday, September 12, and all exhibits must be removed by 8 p.m. on September 12. The fair superintendent will check out each exhibitor’s birds and inspect each bird’s cage. Exhibitors must clean their cages and remove all feeders and waterers by that time.
Aside from the Commercial Egg Production Hybrid Layer Class, participants in the Commercial Egg Production Hybrid Layer Class are also required to exhibit two types of birds and participate in an educational display. This display can be in the form of a poster, informational pamphlet, or information about their business.
Applicants must be at least six years of age or older at the time of the show. They must also be registered in the correct division and class. Upon judging, contestants will be given a score sheet. Afterward, they will be released along with the rest of the poultry exhibits.

How Can the Washington NW Serama Club's Hybrid Layer Class Revolutionize Commercial Egg Production?

How Can the Washington NW Serama Club’s Hybrid Layer Class Revolutionize Commercial Egg Production?

Can Feeder Pig Barrows Or Gilts Under 200 Pounds Win at the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show?

If you plan to breed pigs, you should separate breeding gilts from the market herd at about four to five months of age. A breeding gilt should weigh about 175 to 225 pounds, ideally 250 pounds or more. It should also have completed the second heat cycle and be at least two months old before breeding. During this time, the gilt should be flushed to encourage ovulation and increase litter size. You should avoid feeding high-quality feed to breeding gilts, as it can lead to increased embryonic mortality and reduced litter size.
The pig’s weight, bones, and feet should be in good condition. Check for signs of leg problems, including calluses and abscesses. The toes should have an even spread. The external genitalia of the pig should be well developed, and the vulva should be of average size. It is better to avoid gilts with small vulvae that point upwards.

Can Feeder Pig Barrows Or Gilts Under 200 Pounds Win at the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show?

Can Feeder Pig Barrows Or Gilts Under 200 Pounds Win at the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show?

Can Feeder Pigs Compete in Breeding Classes at the Washington NW Serama Club Show?

The Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show does not accept feeder pig cross entries. Feeder pigs are not allowed to compete in the breeding classes unless they are under 200 pounds. The entry period for this event runs from May 1 to May 31, 2018.
In order to compete in breeding classes, you must own the birds. Regardless of whether the birds are males or females, the breed or variety must be identifiable to the judges. The breed and age of the breed are required for each class.
Feeder pigs may be cross-entered only once under the same owner, farm, or business name. Otherwise, they will forfeit prizes and premiums. All entries must be show-quality. You can mail in entry forms and pay the entry fee with cash or by check. Make checks payable to the Evergreen State Fairgrounds.

Can Feeder Pigs Compete in Breeding Classes at the Washington NW Serama Club Show?

Can Feeder Pigs Compete in Breeding Classes at the Washington NW Serama Club Show?

What Are the Rules for the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show?

If you’re planning on entering the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show, there are a few rules you’ll want to know. This show is a great way to get your Seramas into a show with other poultry enthusiasts. Seramas are small, friendly chickens that are easy to catch and love to be around new people. As a result, the number of Serama shows is growing by the year. In Oklahoma, the Sooner Serama Council has held three tabletop shows in the last two years. These shows judge birds not just on their appearance but also on their character and performance.
To enter this show, your Serama must meet all color requirements for the species you’re entering. You can find these requirements on the SCNA website. While it may be a challenge to breed birds to meet the color requirements, it will be rewarding to enter your birds into the show hall. You’ll be able to get recognition for your effort by being able to show consistently-colored Serama.
You can submit up to three breeds in the show. Birds must be at least four months old in order to qualify. In addition, you must have a proper entry form for each breed of bird you’re showing. You should also include the number of the leg band on each bird so that everyone can identify it correctly.
You may also present educational displays at the show. This can include posters and educational presentations that demonstrate how you care for your birds. Educational displays should be related to the poultry industry, whether they’re flat or three-dimensional. Herdsmanship displays are also encouraged.

What Are the Rules for the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show?

What Are the Rules for the Washington NW Serama Club Stand Alone Poultry Show?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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