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Unlock the Mysteries Of the Jacksonville Pigeon Club

By Tom Seest

Discovering the Secrets Of the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club All-Breed Pigeon Poultry

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The Illinois Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club is a group of enthusiasts who raise all-breed pigeons. These birds are both domesticated and feral. They have an unusual system of veins in the upper part of their bodies. Some of them are even bred for racing.

Discovering the Secrets Of the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club All-Breed Pigeon Poultry

Discovering the Secrets Of the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club All-Breed Pigeon Poultry

Where Do Rock Pigeons Come From?

Pigeons are members of the family Columbiformes. They are found throughout the world and include the doves and pigeons. They are large, feathered birds with distinctly rounded cere and large crops. They also have an unusual system of veins in their upper neck, known as the plexus venosus. If these veins are ruptured, there is a risk of extensive hemorrhage and even death. Pigeons are primarily kept for meat and racing, although some breeds are also used for biomedical research.

Where Do Rock Pigeons Come From?

Where Do Rock Pigeons Come From?

What Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club’s Fleshy Cere Reveal?

Pigeons are large, meaty birds with a fleshy cere and a large crop. They also lack a gall bladder and have an unusual system of veins in the upper neck called the plexus venosus. If a pigeon develops a tumor on this organ, it can result in an extensive hemorrhage or even death. They also have large crops and secrete a milk-like substance called crop milk.

What Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club's Fleshy Cere Reveal?

What Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club’s Fleshy Cere Reveal?

What Unusual Vein System Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club All-Breed Pigeon Poultry Have?

The veins in the upper part of pigeons are not typical. While pigeons do not have a gall bladder, they do have a unique system of veins. These veins are located on the upper part of their neck. If these veins become damaged, the birds can suffer from hemorrhage and even death.
The pigeon breed was first recognized in 1880. By 1885, pigeon breeders and enthusiasts began forming clubs. One of the first meetings was held in the editorial office of “Poultry” magazine. The meeting was chaired by Harrison Weir, and the secretary was Alex Comyns. The agenda for the meeting included the formation of a provisional committee, a constitution, and draft rules. The new members would vote on these items.

What Unusual Vein System Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club All-Breed Pigeon Poultry Have?

What Unusual Vein System Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club All-Breed Pigeon Poultry Have?

How Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club Breed Pigeons for Racing?

All-breed pigeons are bred for racing and are prized for speed and endurance. The sport is popular, and the birds can earn top honors in many different events. Illinois pigeon fanciers can look forward to the fall and winter shows.
A pigeon’s physical characteristics are distinctive, with a fleshy cere and a large crop. They lack a gall bladder and have an unusual system of veins in the upper neck called the plexus venosus. If the plexus venosus becomes infected, it can result in extensive hemorrhage and death. Pigeons also share egg incubation, which is performed by both sexes. They also secrete crop milk, which contains desquamated epithelial cells.

How Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club Breed Pigeons for Racing?

How Does the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club Breed Pigeons for Racing?

Can the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club’s Poultry Compete in a One-Loft Race?

One-loft races are events where all pigeons are raised in the same loft and are trained to fly together. Once they have completed training, they are released at the same time and race back to their home loft. There are four races in a season, each longer than the last. Each race follows a set pattern.
The Illinois Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club has been around since 1973. The club meets six times a year. Sarah Brown has been raising pigeons for 15 years and has more than two dozen birds. The club used to hold a show in Nichols Park, but the pavilion closed for renovations.
Competitions in pigeon racing can be watched online or in person. You can also get involved by joining a local club. If you are new to pigeon racing, clubs are more than happy to share their knowledge and expertise.
Racing pigeons are the same species as feral pigeons but have been selectively bred to emphasize speed, strength, and stamina. They are also sometimes called athletes of the air.

Can the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club's Poultry Compete in a One-Loft Race?

Can the Jacksonville Area Pigeon Club’s Poultry Compete in a One-Loft Race?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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