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Protect Yourself & Enjoy Fresh Eggs: Safely Handling Backyard Chicken Eggs

By Tom Seest

How Can You Safely Handle Eggs From Backyard Chickens?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

More backyard poultry enthusiasts are asking, “How to handle the eggs from backyard chickens?” Because poultry eggs are very porous, the way they are handled can have a significant impact on the quality of the eggs and the health of humans. This article covers the proper handling techniques for eggs.

How Can You Safely Handle Eggs From Backyard Chickens?

How Can You Safely Handle Eggs From Backyard Chickens?

Is Dry Cleaning the Best Way to Handle Eggs From Backyard Chickens?

In the United States, most backyard chicken owners and farmers wash their eggs with water to remove any visible dirt, bacteria, and parasites. However, immersion washing is not recommended for eggs. Moreover, immersion washing exposes the eggs to bacterial growth. In contrast, dry cleaning leaves the eggs‘ natural antibacterial coating intact and allows them to be stored unrefrigerated. In dry cleaning, the egg is simply wiped with fine-grained sandpaper or an abrasive sponge.
Ideally, the coop and eggs should be cleaned at least twice a day. Nevertheless, soiled eggs will inevitably occur, and cleaning them is necessary to avoid foodborne illnesses. Freshly laid eggs are often wet, and the eggshell feels moist. The moisture of the eggshell contains bloom, which acts as an anti-bacterial agent. However, because eggs are porous, bacteria can get through the eggshell’s pores.
Although some sources recommend using bleach to clean eggs, this chemical may have harmful effects on your food. Additionally, bleach can cause the eggs to lose their bloom. In addition, you should also avoid using a combination of bleach and cold water to clean eggs. While these solutions can be useful for mildly dirty eggs, you should never use them in cooking.
Keeping your chickens healthy and clean is crucial for preventing foodborne illnesses. In particular, you should always wash your hands before and after collecting eggs. This will reduce the chance of introducing bacteria from home to the eggs. Salmonella is a serious food-borne disease, but the good news is that it is preventable. Good husbandry practices and biosecurity practices can prevent this risk.
The feces from backyard chickens can be contaminated. The best way to avoid this is to keep the poultry house clean and free of dust. Sand is an ideal bedding material because it releases moisture quickly. Moreover, its grains do not absorb water, making it easier to dry. This material is also less conducive to the growth of pathogens.
The poultry house should also be draft-free and have good air exchange. Make sure to check for drafts on high and low points and in corners. You can also use a candle to check the air quality.

Is Dry Cleaning the Best Way to Handle Eggs From Backyard Chickens?

Is Dry Cleaning the Best Way to Handle Eggs From Backyard Chickens?

How Can Plastic Egg Holders Make Sharing Eggs Easier?

Whether you want to sell your eggs at a farmers market or share them with friends, plastic egg holders make sharing eggs easy, they can be washed and reused. They can also be purchased from farm supply stores. It is important to label the eggs with the date they were collected.

How Can Plastic Egg Holders Make Sharing Eggs Easier?

How Can Plastic Egg Holders Make Sharing Eggs Easier?

How to Char an Egg From Your Backyard Chickens?

There are a few tips to remember when cooking an egg from backyard chickens. First, you should inspect the egg visually for discoloration, mold, or bacteria. If you find any, you should immediately discard it. Otherwise, it should still be fresh and safe to eat.
Secondly, you should understand the FDA’s guidelines when cooking eggs. While this is an important recommendation for industrial foods served directly to consumers, it is not applicable to backyard chickens. Unlike the chickens you buy at a store, you know exactly where your eggs come from, how they are produced, and how they are handled in the kitchen. Ultimately, the safest way to cook an egg is to cook it until it is almost charred. However, this is not the healthiest option.
Another good option is to cook an egg in the oven, which is one of the most popular methods. This method is often referred to as Teyvat Fried Egg. It is another method of cooking a charred egg from backyard chickens. Cooking a charred egg from backyard chickens is an excellent way to use fresh eggs in your cooking.
Chickens usually lay eggs in the morning, and a hen can lay two eggs in a day. The best way to buy your eggs is to buy farm-fresh eggs from your local farmers. This way, you can support your local economy by eating your eggs. In addition to that, you can handle them with care, ensuring that they’re not damaged by heat or the charring process.
Homesteaders often keep a garden and offer their chickens food scraps. A family of two backyard chickens can easily provide enough fresh eggs for one or two people. In fact, a couple of hens can feed an entire household for a year.

How to Char an Egg From Your Backyard Chickens?

How to Char an Egg From Your Backyard Chickens?

Can Salmonella Lurk in Backyard Chickens?

Salmonella germs are a common source of food poisoning and have been linked to multiple outbreaks of illness across the United States in recent years. People who own backyard chickens and ducks should be aware of the risk of salmonella and follow proper practices when handling backyard poultry. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warn that the bacteria can easily spread to humans and livestock from backyard poultry.
A recent outbreak of salmonella linked to backyard chickens in the United States is causing concern among poultry owners. According to the CDC, there are more than 200 confirmed cases in 38 states. While the CDC’s report only details the reported cases, the true number of people who have become ill is likely much higher. Many people who have been exposed to salmonella do not seek medical care or get tested. The outbreak was linked to the handling of eggs from backyard chickens and caused the hospitalization of at least 27 people. One person died in Tennessee.
Symptoms of salmonella infection include high fever and diarrhea, and some people have been known to develop dehydration and vomiting. If you think you may be suffering from a salmonella infection, contact your primary care doctor and follow their advice. You may also contact your local health department if you own backyard chickens.
Salmonella outbreaks from backyard chickens have led to outbreaks in 38 states. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, outbreaks have caused at least two hundred and ninety-nine cases of salmonella in people handling eggs from backyard chickens. The illness outbreaks have led to several deaths and hospitalizations. The outbreaks are often accompanied by an increase in poultry sales in spring.
Many first-time poultry owners don’t know that chickens carry salmonella. They mistakenly assume chickens do not carry the bacteria and can carry them around without harming them. But even if chickens look healthy, they may still be carrying the bacteria. Unless you treat the chickens with antibiotics, you may be at risk for salmonella.

Can Salmonella Lurk in Backyard Chickens?

Can Salmonella Lurk in Backyard Chickens?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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