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The Surprising Cost Of Raising Backyard Chickens

By Tom Seest

How Much Does Keeping Backyard Chickens Cost?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

The upfront cost of having backyard chickens is generally about $2.00 – $5 per chicken, but this can vary depending on the breed and age of the birds. Common breeds can cost as little as $2.00 each, while rare breeds can cost up to $30 per bird. Generally, chickens are sold at four to six weeks of age, but some breeds can cost even more.

How Much Does Keeping Backyard Chickens Cost?

How Much Does Keeping Backyard Chickens Cost?

What Does it Cost to Feed Backyard Chickens?

Backyard chickens need a varied diet to live healthy and strong. You can feed them scraps, treats, and even some vegetables from your garden. You can also give them pellets to help them grow and develop. Backyard chooks should also have clean, fresh water and interesting things to peck at. You can find more information on nutrition from the Australian Poultry Cooperative Research Centre and the NSW Department of Primary Industry.
Although water deprivation in backyard poultry is relatively rare, there are some common mistakes to avoid. The most important thing to remember when feeding backyard chickens is that water is one of the most important ingredients. You should ensure that your chickens have access to clean, cool water and that they drink it at least two times a day.
Backyard chickens are great pets because they’re very sociable and intelligent. They will eat insects, table scraps, and other foods. But it is important to feed them a well-balanced diet if you want them to produce eggs. For this purpose, it is best to feed commercial laying hen pellets. These pellets contain the proper proportion of proteins, minerals, and energy.
Mealworms are another great food option for backyard chickens. These are excellent sources of methionine, an essential amino acid found in animal tissues. Providing your chickens with sufficient methionine is essential for their health and can help prevent diseases. Mealworms, however, should be fed in moderation.
Besides being a free source of protein, mealworms are excellent snacks for chickens. To supplement their diet, scatter some mealworms on the ground or the floor of their coop. During the winter, you can supplement their diet with dark green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and kale. Greens are rich in nutrients and can help balance their diet. Another excellent source of protein is scrambled eggs. When served warm, scrambled eggs can keep your backyard chickens warm and nourished.
You can buy chicken feed in several different varieties and brands. Some of them come in large bags of 50 pounds, while others come in smaller bags of two to five pounds. You can divide the price of the bag by the number of pounds it contains and use this information to calculate the cost of feeding your flock. The price per pound can also help you compare between brands and types of feed.

What Does it Cost to Feed Backyard Chickens?

What Does it Cost to Feed Backyard Chickens?

What Does Backyard Chicken Housing Cost?

The initial cost of raising backyard chickens is relatively low. The coop itself can easily accommodate four chickens. Feeders and drinkers will also cost some money but can also be repurposed or homemade. If you plan on using secondhand equipment, make sure to thoroughly clean and disinfect it. Feed is another cost that can quickly add up. In general, 30 chickens will eat about 50 pounds of feed every two weeks. That translates to around $6 per week.
Typically, the setup cost of backyard chickens is approximately $69 per month for five chickens. This price includes the birds, feed, bedding, a high-quality coop, and miscellaneous costs, such as feeders and medicine. You can save some money by repurposing an old garden shed.
In addition to providing fresh eggs for family and friends, backyard chickens can also help you save money on food. The droppings from the chickens are good for the garden and can reduce your feed costs. Besides providing delicious food, chickens can also provide entertainment. While the initial investment may be higher, the cost of keeping backyard chickens is well worth it.
Bedding for chickens is a must-have for backyard chickens. You can use straw bales and raked leaves for bedding. However, if you don’t have access to a free-range pasture, hay may be a better option. In addition to bedding, chickens will need other supplies, such as scratching posts, feeders, and waterers. You should plan on spending around $10 per month for these items.
Chickens are social animals, and they will not lay eggs unless they have company. They can also catch random diseases, and you have to watch them carefully to avoid becoming sick. The cost of baby chicks can range from $3 to $5. Keep in mind that they need constant monitoring, and it may take a few months for them to produce edible eggs.
The cost of chicken feed varies greatly. Free-range chickens need less feed than their conventional counterparts. Organic and medicated feed will cost more. In addition, chickens eat less when temperatures rise.

What Does Backyard Chicken Housing Cost?

What Does Backyard Chicken Housing Cost?

How Many Eggs Will My Chickens Lay?

If you are interested in raising backyard chickens for egg production, then you will have to be prepared to invest a little bit of money. This is because a fertilized egg costs about $3, and after that, you will have to shell out about $20 per egg in feed costs. In addition to the cost of feed, you will also have to buy roosters, set up costs for an incubator, and electricity to power the brooder. There are many reasons to raise backyard chickens, and one of the main reasons is for egg production.
In addition to the cost of keeping chickens, the cost of raising them is dependent on the breed and the living conditions. You can choose from heritage breeds and modern hybrid varieties. The leghorn chicken, for example, is a well-known breed and is very robust but fragile.
When buying chicks for egg production, you must consider the age of the birds and their past health history. Although day-old chicks are relatively inexpensive, raising them is time-consuming and requires special attention. Alternatively, you can choose to buy pullets, which are older chicks that have already begun laying eggs. Pullets are slightly more expensive than day-old chicks and require more maintenance. Besides feeding the birds, you will have to purchase supplements and bedding on a regular basis.
Although the cost of backyard chickens for egg production is higher than that of store-bought eggs, the costs will decrease over time. Moreover, your chickens will be able to produce eggs in your backyard and will give you the peace of mind that your food is organic. This is the best way to protect your family from the harmful effects of conventional farming.
Apart from egg production, you can also make a profit out of your flock by using their droppings to fertilize your garden. You can also sell the fertilized eggs you receive from your rooster. Besides, chickens can be used for meat and feathers.

How Many Eggs Will My Chickens Lay?

How Many Eggs Will My Chickens Lay?

What Does It Take to Care for Backyard Hens?

Chickens are cheap to own, but they do require some initial expenses. These include the cost of bedding and grit, as well as a coop and lighting. Some of the essentials can be free or easily obtained secondhand. The overall cost will depend on the type of chickens you’re getting, their location, and how much room you have in your backyard for them to roam. You should also budget for ongoing costs, such as food, grit, and healthcare. Chickens also need nappies, which will cost about $40 per week.
Chickens need fresh water every day, and if their water is not clean, they might be at risk of picking up diseases. In addition to clean water, chickens also need regular deworming. You can purchase deworming products from a veterinarian, but it’s important to remember that not all veterinarians are experienced with chickens.
In addition to cleaning up their droppings and fertilizing your garden, chickens will also be a great source of pest control. Their droppings are highly beneficial for crops, and roosters will help you hatch replacement stock or even extra birds for the table. Having backyard chickens can save you a lot of money on feed, and they provide you with pest control and fertilization, all for a relatively low cost.
In addition to a coop, chickens will need daily feed, water, grit, and bedding. They will also need regular deworming and parasite treatments. The cost of feed will vary based on your location, but the cost of a flock of five laying hens will be about $30 or $50 per month on regular layer pellets. Feed costs are higher for organic or medicated feed. Chickens will eat less during hotter weather, so you should plan accordingly.
The first year of laying eggs is critical because it’s during this time that chickens produce the most eggs. After that, egg production started to decline. In addition, the quality of eggshells decreases, and older hens are likely to develop cracked shells. In addition, commercial egg producers usually cull hens at two to three years of age.

What Does It Take to Care for Backyard Hens?

What Does It Take to Care for Backyard Hens?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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