We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Backyard Chickens.

backyard-chicken-news-logo-500-x-500
Please Share With Your Friends and Family

Discover the Benefits Of Urban Chicken Farming In Vancouver

By Tom Seest

Is Backyard Chicken Farming Right for Vancouver?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

If you live in Vancouver and would like to raise backyard chickens, here are some tips to get you started. These tips include building a good chicken coop, keeping your chickens safe from urban predators, and obtaining a permit. After you’ve finished reading this article, you’ll be able to make your own decision about whether or not to keep chickens in Vancouver.

Is Backyard Chicken Farming Right for Vancouver?

Is Backyard Chicken Farming Right for Vancouver?

Are Backyard Chickens Allowed in Vancouver?

In June 2010, the City of Vancouver passed a bylaw allowing backyard chickens, but only 25 licenses have been issued. According to Tom Hammel, Assistant Director & Deputy Chief Licence Inspector with Licensing & Animal Control, only seven complaints have been made since the bylaw came into effect. While the bylaw doesn’t specifically prohibit backyard chickens, it does require people to build adequate chicken coops and secure them at night. They also need to have ample space for their chickens, and they are not permitted to sell their eggs or slaughter them for profit.
Vancouver bylaws allow up to four chickens per lot, but roosters are prohibited. Despite the limitations of backyard chickens, Vancouver residents can enjoy up to four eggs a day. And for those who want to turn their hobby into a business, the eggs can fetch as much as $6 a dozen. And despite the costs, the chicken feed is relatively cheap.
The City of Vancouver’s Animal Control facility has no proper facilities for seized or surrendered chickens, and there is also a high risk of avian flu for pet birds. In addition, keeping backyard flocks could put them at risk of contracting the disease from urban chickens.
While you’re unsure about the legality of keeping chickens in Vancouver, you can raise hamsters, guinea pigs, chinchillas, cats, and snakes. However, you must consult with the city’s Department of Environment and Health for further details. If you’re thinking of getting a backyard chicken farm, check out Velopalooza’s Tour de Coop on June 7th. This tour will stop at ten different coops located in the Grandview-Woodlands neighborhood. The tour will end at 1831 McSpadden Ave.
While chicken keeping is allowed in many areas of the city, many municipalities have stricter regulations and restrictions. Some municipalities don’t allow backyard chickens or limit the number of chickens per household. Furthermore, roosters are not allowed as they may disturb neighbors, and young chickens cannot be used to determine sex.
In Vancouver, you can keep backyard chickens in single-family residential zones, but you need to have a space for chickens that is at least six square feet. The area must also be sufficiently far from your house and property for your chickens to be safe. In Vancouver, it is also important to remember that chickens need proper sanitary conditions. If you don’t keep them in the proper conditions, the chickens may escape and cause damage to your yard.

Are Backyard Chickens Allowed in Vancouver?

Are Backyard Chickens Allowed in Vancouver?

Is Your Vancouver Backyard Ready for a Chicken Coop?

If you want to raise backyard chickens in Vancouver, there are many things to consider. You’ll need a sturdy framework, roosts, and plenty of space. You’ll also need to consider where you’re going to place your coop. It’s best to build it on an elevated platform that’s at least two feet above the ground, with an opening big enough to catch hens if they get out.
Choosing the right material for your chicken coop is crucial for the health of your chickens. Choose materials that won’t harm the hens and are non-toxic. If you live in a humid climate, choose a paint or varnish that’s anti-fungal. Also, be sure to leave one-fifth of the coop’s walls open to ensure ventilation. Ventilation is crucial to keep chickens healthy and away from disease. You’ll also want to make sure your coop’s walls are draft-free and have an opening that’s higher than the roosts.
Before you begin building a chicken coop, you should make sure you’re in compliance with Vancouver’s regulations and local codes. If you don’t follow the rules, you risk being fined $250 per violation. If you’re looking to start a chicken flock, you may want to consult with your neighbors and ask their permission first.
The best way to protect your backyard chickens from predators is to build a coop that’s structurally sound and has enough space for roosting bars, nesting boxes, waterers, and space for feeders. You’ll also need to consider the strength of your building material and the gauge of the wire. If your coop doesn’t allow ventilation, your chickens will become uncomfortable and unhappy.
The size of your chicken coop will depend on the number of chickens you plan to keep. If you want to keep your chickens mainly outside, you can build a smaller coop. If you’d like to keep them inside, however, you’ll need at least three square feet of space per chicken. If you want to keep more than three chickens, you’ll need a larger coop, preferably nine to twelve square feet.
Your coop will need to be ventilated and dry for the birds to survive in colder temperatures. If the coop isn’t properly ventilated, moisture from the birds’ droppings and respiration won’t escape, and they’ll get frostbite on their wattles, combs, and toes. In addition, frostbite can affect their fertility. It’s best to use a hygrometer to monitor relative humidity and keep the coop free of drafts so the chickens can have adequate moisture.

Is Your Vancouver Backyard Ready for a Chicken Coop?

Is Your Vancouver Backyard Ready for a Chicken Coop?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


Please Share With Your Friends and Family