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An Overview Of Biosecurity Concerns with Backyard Chickens

By Tom Seest

Is Biosecurity a Problem with Backyard Chickens?

Biosecurity is a vitally important part of raising backyard chickens. There are several diseases that can infect backyard poultry, and many producers do not realize that visitors can easily transport them. Disease organisms can be spread on clothing, footwear, or even the tires of vehicles. The avian influenza virus, for example, is easily transmitted via nasal secretions of infected birds. Furthermore, infected manure can be tracked into the chicken coop. Food scraps can also attract wild animals and spread disease.

Is Biosecurity a Problem with Backyard Chickens?

Is Biosecurity a Problem with Backyard Chickens?

This photo was taken by Quang Nguyen Vinh and is available on Pexels at https://www.pexels.com/photo/man-in-traditional-asian-hat-spitting-water-on-a-rooster-6875224/.

Is Avian Encephalomyelitis Virus a Biosecurity Problem with Chickens?

Backyard chickens have been implicated as reservoirs for avian encephalomyelitis virus (AENV), a highly pathogenic virus that is spreading through the poultry industry. However, the mechanisms involved in spillover between backyard and commercial poultry are not yet fully understood. The most likely mechanism involves wild birds. Lebarbenchon et al. hypothesized that small passerines served as bridge hosts between waterfowl and turkey houses, where they spread the virus. This suggests that some wild bird species are of particular concern and are being exposed to the H7N9 virus.
Infected chicks typically develop clinical symptoms between two and four weeks of age. They become unsteady and fall to their sides. The disease is fatal if not treated promptly. The mortality rate depends on the number of eggs infected and the immunity level of the flock. In severe cases, it can exceed 50%.
Infected hens should not be brought into contact with wild birds. The disease can also spread through the eggshell. Infected hens may also pass it to their chicks. A chicken with the virus should be quarantined and isolated from other flocks and should remain isolated for at least 30 days.
Avian encephalomyelitis, also known as epidemic tremor, is an infectious neurological disease. Infected birds exhibit tremors, ataxia, weakness, and tremors. In severe cases, paralysis can occur. The virus is highly contagious, and vaccination is essential to prevent its spread.
The virus may affect backyard flocks, commercial poultry, and wild birds. It is extremely contagious and causes high mortality rates, so it’s important to be aware of the signs and symptoms. Symptoms of this disease include diarrhea, respiratory distress, and a dark red/white discoloration on the head and neck.
The AE and CIA viruses are widespread in poultry-producing countries, and backyard chickens can be at risk. The infection can lead to reduced feed intake, reduced egg production, and mortality. The disease is highly contagious, which is why commercial farms take biosecurity measures to protect their flocks.
Avian encephalomyelitis is contagious and can be fatal if not treated correctly. Backyard poultry is susceptible to infection with AI because they are free-range and often come into contact with other types of poultry. They may also come in contact with wild birds and come into contact with unsanitary conditions.
Despite the danger of AEV, the virus is not as serious as once thought. The IUCN has identified several new pathogens that have been associated with backyard chickens. In addition to avian encephalomyelitis virus, avian poxvirus and avian adenovirus-2 are all threatening wild bird populations.
A recent cross-sectional study conducted in Zhejiang Province, China, identified risk factors associated with AEV infections in backyard chickens.

Is Avian Encephalomyelitis Virus a Biosecurity Problem with Chickens?

Is Avian Encephalomyelitis Virus a Biosecurity Problem with Chickens?

This photo was taken by Tehmasip Khan and is available on Pexels at https://www.pexels.com/photo/close-up-of-a-rooster-7327380/.

Is Mycoplasma Gallisepticum a Biosecurity Problem with Chickens?

Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most common cause of respiratory infection in backyard chickens. It is highly infectious and thrives in stressed and debilitated birds. Common debilitating factors include poor nutrition, exposure to dust, and change in pecking order. Biosecurity practices and proper management of flocks can help prevent the spread of the disease.
The clinical signs of Mycoplasma infection vary depending on the type of the disease. Chickens with Mycoplasma gallisepticum may exhibit reduced hatchability, mild respiratory distress, lameness, depression, and sinusitis. The infection is more serious in turkeys, where it is known as Infectious Sinusitis. To identify the presence of Mycoplasma infection, a variety of diagnostic tests can be used. Poultry samples are submitted to a licensed laboratory for testing. Results are then reported to the flock owner or hatchery.
A common symptom of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection is a foamy discharge from the nostrils. Infection may also affect the eyes, nose, and lungs. Some chickens may also fail to gain weight or lay poor-quality eggs.
M gallisepticum infection can be prevented in backyard flocks by using commercially available vaccines and preventing the spread of the disease to other flocks. In the USA, three live vaccines are licensed for this purpose. The vaccines provide protection for chickens during their growth phase. Infection can also be prevented in flocks by implementing good biosecurity practices.
MG is not usually fatal to chickens, but it can severely limit their productivity. If not treated, the symptoms can persist for months or years. The best way to prevent this disease is to raise a healthy flock and quarantine new birds. Infection can also occur in wild birds.
The poultry industry is an important industry in Southeast Asia, which requires biosecurity policies. One of the main threats to poultry farms is infectious respiratory diseases. Although avian influenza and Newcastle disease have been reported in Myanmar, there is currently limited scientific information on other respiratory pathogens. In some Southeast Asian countries, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae have been found in poultry farms.
The poultry industry is suffering due to spreading misinformation. This misinformation is often offered to other poultry owners as a means to prevent culling diseased flocks. This is unethical and harmful to the poultry industry. In some cases, the misinformation is offered to justify the sale of unhealthy chicks and hatching eggs.
MG can be passed to chickens through the eggs and respiratory secretions of infected birds. It is also spread by airborne routes. The disease may survive for several days in the egg and can also be passed from parent birds to progeny. Vaccination is recommended to control the infection in commercial chickens. It should also be administered to affected broiler breeder flocks prior to infection.
Vaccination programs are important for preventing the spread of Mycoplasma. The National Poultry Improvement Plan offers a range of programs for participating breeder flocks. In addition to commercial and backyard chickens, the National Poultry Improvement Plan includes turkeys and waterfowl.

Is Mycoplasma Gallisepticum a Biosecurity Problem with Chickens?

Is Mycoplasma Gallisepticum a Biosecurity Problem with Chickens?

This photo was taken by beytlik and is available on Pexels at https://www.pexels.com/photo/poulty-of-hens-on-an-enclosure-7522135/.


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