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An Overview Of Backyard Chicken Safety

By Tom Seest

Is It Safe to Have Backyard Chickens?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

If you’ve ever wanted to raise your own flock of backyard chickens, you probably have plenty of questions. You’ve likely heard about the dangers of salmonella, avian influenza, E. coli, and campylobacteriosis. You’re probably also concerned about predators. Here’s what you need to know.

Is It Safe to Have Backyard Chickens?

Is It Safe to Have Backyard Chickens?

Is Salmonella Common with Backyard Chickens?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is investigating a salmonella outbreak that is attributed to backyard poultry. As of December 2018, more than two hundred people from 38 states were infected with the bacterium. Of these, twenty-seven people were hospitalized, and one person died. The true number of infections is likely higher. Because of the lengthy investigation process, recent illnesses may not have been reported yet. According to CDC data, more than 1,000 people became ill from salmonella in backyard poultry in 2010. Outbreaks typically coincide with the spring chick purchase season.
Salmonella is often present in contaminated chicken meat during processing. The majority of people who contract salmonella have no symptoms, but some strains can be severe. They can cause joint pain for several months and, in some cases, reactive arthritis. However, most people recover without medical intervention. It’s important to understand the risk of salmonella to prevent infection in backyard chickens.
The CDC estimates that the increased number of outbreaks is related to the growing number of backyard poultry owners. In the United States alone, there are over 1.2 million salmonella cases, resulting in more than 23,000 hospitalizations and 450 deaths. More than one million of these illnesses are related to food, and only about eight percent are directly associated with backyard poultry. The CDC also notes that salmonella outbreaks are not solely related to chickens and can occur in pets, turtles, and commercially processed shell eggs.
A simple hygiene regimen can help prevent salmonella outbreaks in backyard chickens. Keeping chicken coops and nesting boxes clean will help to reduce the risk of contamination. Moreover, make sure to replace the litter regularly. In addition, remember to collect the eggs often. Separate clean eggs from dirty ones, and discard cracked or broken ones. Furthermore, avoid feeding your chickens expired meat or other foods that may contain mold or bacteria.
The CDC recommends handwashing stations and hand sanitizers whenever handling poultry. You should also store poultry in an area away from children and pets. You should also provide a poster explaining the precautions you should take to protect your backyard flock from Salmonella infections. The poster should be posted near the display area of the flock and given to any potential buyers.

Is Salmonella Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is Salmonella Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is Avian Influenza Common with Backyard Chickens?

In the last few years, there have been a number of outbreaks of avian influenza, including cases of bird flu in backyard chickens. The virus has infected chickens in the Pacific Northwest and Midwest, killing about 51 million chickens in the United States. While it is not as severe as the human virus, it is still a serious risk.
There are two types of avian influenza – low pathogenic (LPAI) and highly pathogenic (HPAI). LPAI tends to cause less severe disease than HPAI. However, certain LPAI strains can mutate, creating more pathogenic strains. High pathogenic (HPAI) strains can lead to serious disease and rapid death in susceptible birds.
Bird flu can spread to humans through direct contact with an infected bird. Infected chickens must be quarantined and should be kept away from humans. The more contact with infected birds, the higher the risk of contracting the disease. Keeping chickens away from other poultry is the best way to prevent the spread of avian influenza.
When a flock of backyard chickens has a suspected case of AI, the local Animal Health department must be notified. A representative of Animal Health would visit your farm and collect samples from your flock. If the birds were positive for the virus, they would have to be put to sleep. The agency would also inspect surrounding poultry holdings and possibly advise the poultry keepers to confine their flocks indoors.
Though avian influenza outbreaks are not widespread in backyard chickens, it is still a major concern for chicken owners. Fortunately, there is no cure for avian influenza, and there are many ways to reduce your risk. The most important way to protect your flock from avian influenza is to keep your flock’s immune system high. In some situations, a veterinarian can help you with the vaccination.
Avian influenza is a highly contagious disease caused by influenza viruses. The virus can affect chickens, wild birds, and humans. It is spread through infected birds‘ droppings, and anything in contact with these bird droppings can be infected.

Is Avian Influenza Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is Avian Influenza Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is Campylobacteriosis Common with Backyard Chickens?

Several factors are known to increase the risk of Campylobacteriosis in the backyard poultry population. Poor biosecurity and infrequent feeding are two major factors. In addition, ill birds and wet litter may increase the risk of exposure. Children and backyard poultry owners should be aware of these risk factors and follow best biosecurity practices.
The presence of contaminated feed, water, or bedding may also be a risk factor. It is also possible to acquire Campylobacteriosis from rats and other pests that can transmit this infection to backyard chickens. In addition, commercial poultry litter can become infected over time. Therefore, it is important to use nonchlorinated water. A third source of infection is contaminated equipment.
The onset of campylobacteriosis symptoms usually begins two to five days after exposure. These symptoms include fever, cramping, nausea, and vomiting. Typically, the illness lasts one week. However, in some cases, the bacteria can reach the bloodstream and cause a life-threatening infection.
If you have chickens, you should check them regularly for symptoms of Campylobacteriosis. It can be a serious condition and may require hospitalization. Fortunately, you can prevent the disease from spreading among your flock through careful hygiene practices. Washing hands with soap and water before handling poultry is important to avoid contracting the disease.
Another risk associated with backyard poultry is salmonellosis. Although it is still unknown how infectious backyard poultry is, it is not uncommon for backyard poultry to harbor Salmonella and Campylobacteriosis. The current public health regulations in Australia should address the associated risks of backyard poultry husbandry.
Infection with these bacteria may lead to diarrhea or stomach cramps. The diarrhea can be severe, requiring hospitalization. If you or a family member contracts the disease, it is important to wash your hands with soap and water to reduce the risk of infection. Even a small amount of contaminated chicken may be enough to cause a life-threatening infection.

Is Campylobacteriosis Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is Campylobacteriosis Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is E. Coli Common with Backyard Chickens?

In recent years, there have been many reports of salmonella outbreaks linked to backyard chickens. In 2020 and 2021, these outbreaks caused 2,857 illnesses, 606 hospitalizations, and three deaths. Most of these illnesses occurred among children younger than five years old. The increase in illnesses coincides with the growing number of Americans raising backyard chickens. Chickens carry a wide variety of bacteria, including salmonella.
CDC officials released a warning last week regarding an outbreak of salmonella linked to backyard chickens. As of early July, more than 200 illnesses had been reported in at least 38 states. There have been dozens of hospitalizations and one death. Symptoms of infection usually begin within eight to 72 hours and can persist for weeks. Backyard chicken owners should wash their hands thoroughly after contact with chickens and use safe egg-handling techniques.
Among poultry diseases, infectious bronchitis is considered the most contagious. The virus can live for long periods in soil, and most outbreaks originate from contaminated soil. The virus can also be transferred from poultry to humans through the air and by mechanical means, such as clothing and crates. Although it cannot be transmitted through eggs, the virus can survive up to a week in an uninfected house without poultry. Fortunately, the virus can be destroyed by heat and ordinary disinfectants.
Another common cause of chicken illness is infection by parasites. These parasites infect the cecal cavity of chickens and other poultry. They can also spread to humans, so it is important to use proper mite control products to prevent infections from spreading. To help control the outbreak, you should thoroughly clean the coop, houses, and equipment.
Salmonella is a bacteria that lives in the chicken’s intestine. It feeds on the nutrients from the food that is digested. Salmonella bacteria can remain active in bird droppings for a long time and is passed on by pecking birds. This bacteria can affect any member of the flock, including new chicks. The bacteria can cause up to five percent of the new chicks to die. Signs of salmonella infection include ruffled feathers, a low appetite, and diarrhea.

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.

Is E. Coli Common with Backyard Chickens?

Is E. Coli Common with Backyard Chickens?


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