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Unlock the Risks Of Backyard Chicken Keeping

By Tom Seest

Is Keeping Backyard Chickens Risky?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

If you’re raising backyard chickens, you may be concerned about Salmonella. The bacteria, which can be spread by contact, can cause serious illness. Here’s what you should know about the bacteria and how to avoid getting sick. Also, be sure to check for signs of infection and keep your flock clean and disinfected.

Is Keeping Backyard Chickens Risky?

Is Keeping Backyard Chickens Risky?

Is Salmonella Lurking in Your Backyard?

If you want to raise chickens in your backyard but don’t know how to breed them properly, you could be putting your family at risk for salmonella infection. Salmonella is caused by bacteria and is especially dangerous for people who have weakened immune systems. If you suspect you may have contracted the disease, see a doctor right away. But keeping chickens in your backyard is actually a lot safer than having them raised in battery cages, which are now banned in several countries.
People are at risk for getting salmonella infection from backyard chickens because the bacteria can survive in the intestines of any animal, including humans. Infected individuals usually develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. However, most people recover without medical treatment within a few days. However, certain strains of salmonella can cause more serious conditions, such as reactive arthritis and joint pain lasting months. While most people recover from the disease without treatment, it is important to keep your chickens’ environment clean.
People with weak immune systems and people under five are especially susceptible to salmonella infections. It is also important to wash your hands and change clothes after visiting a poultry farm. Also, it’s important to buy poultry from reputable sources. A good place to start is with National Poultry Improvement Plan-certified sources. This certification ensures that the birds have been tested for serious diseases, including salmonella. But even if the birds have been tested, there is no guarantee they are free of this bacteria. If you suspect you have contracted salmonella, call your health provider immediately.
A report by the CDC shows that there are an estimated seventy-two thousand cases of salmonella in the United States every year. The number of people hospitalized is also growing, and nearly half of them are children. Salmonella is a bacteria that originates in livestock and can be present in backyard chickens.

Is Salmonella Lurking in Your Backyard?

Is Salmonella Lurking in Your Backyard?

Can Backyard Chickens Lead to Salmonella Infection?

If you have backyard chickens, you may be interested in learning more about the possibility of Salmonella contamination. The bacteria can cause serious illness, especially in people with weak immune systems. You should consult a doctor if you suspect you have an infection. If the symptoms last for longer than four days, you should seek medical attention. In severe cases, you may need to be hospitalized.
Backyard chickens and other poultry often carry Salmonella germs and spread them to the environment, so it’s important to wash your hands after handling your chickens or any other poultry. Salmonella can live for many years in the environment, so you should be sure to wash your hands with soap and water after touching any of your chickens or their surroundings.
In a survey of backyard poultry owners in Seattle in 2014, researchers found that nearly a quarter of respondents touched the chickens with their hands or faces. Another quarter of respondents admitted to eating near their chickens. Such close contact increases the risk of exposure to pathogens, especially for young children. Even though chickens are a fun, educational experience, young children should not handle them without adult supervision.
While there is a high risk of salmonella contamination from backyard chickens, this risk is lower than for the average Vermonter. However, the influx of urban chicken keepers has also increased the number of outbreaks of this bacterium. This trend is likely exacerbated by the way chicken owners treat their birds, often treating them as pets and bringing them into their homes for cuddles and kisses.

Can Backyard Chickens Lead to Salmonella Infection?

Can Backyard Chickens Lead to Salmonella Infection?

Can Salmonella Spread Through Contact with Backyard Chickens?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that more than 200 people have become ill in the United States from contact with backyard chickens. An outbreak has hit many states, causing illness, hospitalizations, and one death. Salmonella is spread from contact with backyard poultry and the surroundings in which they live. In addition, it can also be passed on to food or drink that comes into contact with backyard poultry. CDC advises to take caution when handling backyard poultry and to wash your hands for at least 20 seconds after touching them. Also, if you are keeping supplies in the coop, use dedicated footwear and keep them outside the house.
Salmonella has caused outbreaks in many states, including Pennsylvania and Tennessee. The CDC reports that at least two people died from salmonella infections linked to backyard poultry, and there are over 200 cases in 38 states. However, the true number of people infected with this illness is likely higher than the CDC’s total. Most people who contract the disease do not seek medical care or are not tested for salmonella. However, if you are planning to raise backyard chickens, you should learn more about the bacteria that can cause illness.
In addition to backyard chickens, contact with pet turtles and rats can also transmit salmonella bacteria. One outbreak in the USA was linked to pet turtles and affected 19 states. A common factor in all outbreaks is poor hygiene. The bacteria from backyard chickens can get onto packaging, food, and liquids. Because salmonella is spread through mouth contact, it’s important to learn about proper hygiene practices.
If you are planning on keeping backyard chickens, follow the guidelines outlined by the CDC to stay healthy around your flock. This includes avoiding the poultry area and keeping your clothing and shoes clean. People with weakened immune systems and infants are at the highest risk.

Can Salmonella Spread Through Contact with Backyard Chickens?

Can Salmonella Spread Through Contact with Backyard Chickens?

How Can Salmonella Be Prevented in Backyard Chickens?

If you’re thinking of raising chickens for your backyard or for business, you may be concerned about Salmonella. Although the disease is very rare in backyard flocks, you should follow some basic safety tips to avoid infection. First, you should always change your clothes and shoes after visiting a poultry production facility. You should also buy poultry from reputable sources. Choose those that are certified by the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP). This certification will ensure that the birds have undergone rigorous testing to ensure they’re free of the disease.
Secondly, you should practice good hygiene in your coop and around your chickens. Always wash your hands after touching your chickens. Use a hand sanitizer if you’re unable to use soap. You should also make sure that everyone in the family washes their hands before and after handling chickens. Not washing hands can lead to cross-contamination and can lead to Salmonella infection.
Third, you should avoid touching the poop. Poop dust from chickens can easily get on your hands. Young children, especially, have weak immune systems and are at risk of getting sick from touching poop. You should always wash your hands after handling chickens, as well as after using the restroom. If you are unable to wash your hands thoroughly, use a hand sanitizer with 60 percent alcohol.
You can also prevent Salmonella infection by keeping your chickens clean. Clean their coop regularly. You should also isolate chicks from other chickens for two weeks before handling them. Salmonella can cause a range of symptoms. Some of them include reduced egg production, pale comb, weak movements, watery diarrhea, and depression. If you suspect that your chickens are infected, take them to a veterinarian for testing.

How Can Salmonella Be Prevented in Backyard Chickens?

How Can Salmonella Be Prevented in Backyard Chickens?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.

 


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