We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Backyard Chickens.

backyard-chicken-news-logo-500-x-500
Please Share With Your Friends and Family

The Pros and Cons Of Backyard Chicken Or Quail Farming

By Tom Seest

Is Raising Chickens Or Quail Better for Backyard Farming?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

While raising chickens and quail are both great poultry options, there are important differences between the two. Both types produce high-quality meat and eggs. They also have different needs in terms of light and space. If you are considering raising either type of poultry, it is important to know the differences between the two before you begin.

Is Raising Chickens Or Quail Better for Backyard Farming?

Is Raising Chickens Or Quail Better for Backyard Farming?

How Coturnix Quail Can Boost Your Egg Production?

Coturnix quail are small, non-native game birds that can be kept in an urban setting. They do not require large amounts of outdoor space and prefer to live in small, enclosed spaces. They belong to the order Galliformes, which includes several different species.
Coturnix quail starts laying eggs between the ages of five and eight weeks. Their eggs are a cream color with brown speckles and weigh between 8 to 13 grams. They will lay anywhere from two to three hundred eggs per year if given sufficient living space and are kept in a warm, dry place. Despite their small size, Coturnix quail does not require much space compared to chickens. In fact, a mature Coturnix quail only needs one square foot.
There are several types of Coturnix quail available, and each variety has different characteristics. The most common variety is Pharaoh D1, which is the largest producer of eggs. You can also look for crossbred varieties, like a mix of different colors.
Quail were originally used by early American colonists for food because they were inexpensive to hunt and raise. Nowadays, an increasing number of people raise these birds for their meat and eggs. Quail are also quieter than chickens and require much less space than chickens.
Quail live between three and six years. Meat birds are generally kept for one year or two. The egg production and viability of quail eggs decreases as the birds grow older. Incubation periods are 17 days for Coturnix quail, and the birds must be housed in captivity for the first few weeks to ensure proper hatching.

How Coturnix Quail Can Boost Your Egg Production?

How Coturnix Quail Can Boost Your Egg Production?

How Much Space Does a Coturnix Quail Need Compared to a Chicken?

Coturnix quail are very easy to raise and can live in a small area with proper housing and management. The adult birds can be housed in a simple rabbit hutch, which has an open floor and allows the droppings to fall through without contaminating the floor. The cage should be high enough for the birds to stand up, and should not be more than 10 inches tall. This will discourage spooked Coturnix quail from flying up and injuring themselves.
Coturnix quail are not as demanding on housing as chickens. Their smaller body and low energy levels make them suitable for small areas. They can produce a healthy number of eggs each year and can be raised for meat and eggs. The housing requirements for these birds will vary according to the type of quail you choose.
A 2 x 4 ft cage should accommodate four Coturnix quail. A smaller cage will help the birds grow faster and use less energy. The cage should have sides that allow for proper ventilation. Chicken wire or square wire mesh are good cage materials. However, make sure that the cage is secure and that predators cannot reach the birds.
Coturnix quail does not require much space, but they do require fresh food and water all day. Their cages should have several feeding and watering stations. A feeding station should be large enough for one-third of the birds to feed at one time. A feeding station should also have a one-inch space between each adult bird.
These birds live from three to six years. In contrast, chickens live for about two years. The egg production and viability of quail eggs decline as they age.

How Much Space Does a Coturnix Quail Need Compared to a Chicken?

How Much Space Does a Coturnix Quail Need Compared to a Chicken?

Can Coturnix Quail Replace Chickens as Livestock?

Coturnix quail are small, easy-to-care-for birds that require little space. They can be kept as backyard pets or for egg production. Females can lay between 250 and 300 eggs per year. Unlike chickens, they don’t require outdoor space and can be kept in cages.
One drawback to raising quail is that they are messy eaters. Whether they’re kept in an aviary or a cage, their feed will often fall to the ground. Using a “zero waste” feeder can minimize this issue. You can also place a pie tin in the poop tray to catch the stray feed that might otherwise fall through.
Like chickens, quail requires clean, fresh water. They need to drink from troughs that are elevated off the ground. It is also important to provide fresh water to them daily, and to keep the troughs clean of contaminants.
The Coturnix breed is a good choice for many people. While many people prefer the Coturnix breed, there are several other breeds of quail available, including the Chinese-Painted, Japanese, and Button varieties. Depending on the type you choose, you can purchase young quail for around $1 each. However, if you want to raise quail for egg-laying, you should consider a mature bird. Young quail are not fertile, so it’s best to buy a mature bird that has laid many eggs.
Although quail are primarily used for game, you can also raise them as pets. Quail has beautiful, round bodies and lovely plumes. Some people even raise them as ornaments.

Can Coturnix Quail Replace Chickens as Livestock?

Can Coturnix Quail Replace Chickens as Livestock?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


Please Share With Your Friends and Family