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Make Money Raising Meat Chickens

By Tom Seest

Is Raising Meat Chickens a Profitable Investment?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

Raising meat chickens can be expensive. It’s also a very humane and community task. However, the meat production process is not always a peaceful one. This article will cover the cost of keeping broilers and laying hen chickens as well as heritage breeds.

Is Raising Meat Chickens a Profitable Investment?

Is Raising Meat Chickens a Profitable Investment?

How Much Does Raising Meat Chickens Cost?

When raising meat chickens, the main expenses are the feed and labor costs. It’s a good idea to calculate the cost of raising a particular breed so that you know what your return on investment will be. Some breeds are more expensive to raise than others and other breeds need less feed than others.
Feed costs for meat chickens can be very high. This is because the birds need more protein and require more attention than laying chickens. In addition, they need to be kept in an area where predators won’t attack them. Furthermore, they frequently become parched and need clean water.
When calculating the cost of raising meat chickens, you need to consider your desired production method and current market prices. The first step is to determine the amount of feed you’ll need. It’s recommended that you start with a small flock that only needs to produce enough meat for your family or a limited number of market chickens. Alternatively, you can raise capons or roasters, which require more feed per pound of meat.
Meat chickens should be raised in a predator-proof brooder or secure pen. They need about 4 square feet of space per chicken. They should also be kept away from other poultry to reduce the risk of disease and stress. Feeding meat chickens a high-protein diet of chick starters and grower feed is essential for their health.
Commercial broilers are a cross between different breeds. They have been selected for their fast growth. Normally, they are slaughtered between seven and nine weeks. Their carcass weighs about 2.5 to four pounds and is dressed for the market. However, if you prefer a slower-growing meat chicken, you could consider Cornish game hens. These birds can grow to 12 weeks.
While raising meat chickens may not be the most inexpensive option, it is a great way to save money and enjoy eating homegrown meat. As an added bonus, you’ll be able to save a great deal of money and also have healthy and nutritious meat.

How Much Does Raising Meat Chickens Cost?

How Much Does Raising Meat Chickens Cost?

How Much Does It Cost To Raise Laying Hens?

There are several costs involved in laying hens for meat. The first is feeding. A typical laying hen consumes roughly 3/4 cup of chicken feed a day. Keeping a flock that free ranges will reduce feed requirements. You may need to purchase extra feed to keep your flock healthy and happy.
A good laying hen costs about $20 to $50. It should start to lay eggs within a few days. Higher prices are associated with better breeds and more eggs. Plymouth Rock hens cost about $55 and are among the most sought-after breeds.
When comparing prices of laying hens, it is important to consider the age of the hens. Older laying hens are more likely to produce fewer eggs. It may be wise to consider stewing them instead of letting them grow old. However, keeping stewing hens means paying more for eggs than laying ones.
Feeding chickens is another significant expense. An ISA Brown chicken may produce up to $200 in eggs over its lifetime, while a long-lived heritage hen will need more feed than a shorter-lived variety. Egg productivity depends on several factors, including breed, diet, environment, and individual genetics.
The first cost involved in raising chickens for meat is the purchase of chickens. This cost can be as high as $20 per bird and depends on the breed and age. For some breeds, the cost can even be more. You should also be prepared to take care of your chickens in a way that prevents any potential problems.

How Much Does It Cost To Raise Laying Hens?

How Much Does It Cost To Raise Laying Hens?

How Much Does it Cost to Raise Broiler Chickens?

The cost of keeping broiler chickens varies according to the variety and size of the flock. A typical batch is around two thousand birds, but you can increase that number to more than five hundred if you want to produce a larger yield. You should also keep in mind that the price of broilers is higher for males than females. The total cost of raising broilers may be around N 45,000 to N 60,000.
The feed costs are another major cost. Starter feed is required for the first two weeks and 14 days of life, and it can run from $9 to $14 per bird. Fresh water is also necessary daily. Feeding your broiler chickens twice a day is essential, and you’ll need to change their water at least once a day.
Broilers are easy to raise, but they need intensive care. They need high-quality feed and prompt vaccination. They also need adequate ventilation. The meat from broilers is juicier and more flavorful than other types of poultry. A chicken farmer may choose to raise broiler chickens using organic or synthetic feed, though that will be more expensive.
Broiler enterprises used different financing systems. Some used working capital, which was tied up in chicks and feed costs until the birds were sold. While the report doesn’t reflect the cost of keeping broilers in the entire state, it provides some useful information on the costs of raising broilers in the Willamette Valley. It covered costs and returns for 76,962 broilers marketed during the period January 5 to April 15, 1952. Most of these birds were marketed during February and March. Most producers handled only one brood at a time.
Broiler chickens need routine and occasional medical care. While it may be tempting to administer drugs to treat diseases in your chickens, they can increase your production costs. To avoid these expenses, try preventative care methods. These methods will help keep your broilers healthy and grow faster. Also, you should practice biosecurity. You should avoid letting visitors inside the pen and disinfect their footwear with foot dips. You should also restrict the entrance of rodents and wild birds. Last but not least, make sure the pens are properly closed to prevent leaks and other potential carriers of diseases.
In this way, you can determine which factors will affect the cost of producing broiler chickens. You can also use the translog cost function analysis to estimate the elasticity of substitution of inputs. In this way, you can see the impact of changing prices on your cost of broiler production. The elasticity of substitution and the demand for the inputs are related to each other.

How Much Does it Cost to Raise Broiler Chickens?

How Much Does it Cost to Raise Broiler Chickens?

Heritage Breeds: Is the Cost Worth It?

Heritage breed meat chickens are slow-growing and generally have more flavorful meat than commercial chickens. These chickens also tend to be more sustainable for the environment. The New Hampshire breed is one example, which evolved from the intensive selection of Rhode Island Red chickens and is known for its meat-and-egg production. These chickens also like to forage for food and are ready for butchering around 16-20 weeks of age.
Although these chickens require more upkeep and maintenance than modern breeds, they are very productive and healthy. As a bonus, heritage breed chickens contribute to a long tradition of diverse chicken genetics. However, keeping heritage breed meat chickens requires additional expenses. Here are some of the costs associated with heritage breed meat chickens:
Heritage breed chickens are a good choice for backyard poultry owners, but they do require more space and feed than conventional breeds. However, compared to broilers, they produce meat that is more tender and less expensive. For example, Icelandic chickens are harder to find than other breeds and can be very noisy.
There are several factors to consider before deciding on a breed of meat chicken. One of the most important factors is the size of the bird. If it is small, it might be difficult for you to process it. In addition, heritage birds have smaller carcasses, which means that they take longer to process.
Another important factor to consider is the growing period of heritage breed meat chickens. The longer it takes for heritage breeds to grow, the greater the risk of predation. Heritage breed meat chickens are also more expensive than modern chickens. They require more space to be mature and healthy. A reputable breeder will give you chicks that meet breed standards.
In addition to laying eggs, heritage-breed meat chickens are great for meat production. Many breeds will lay as many as 300 eggs a year. This makes them ideal for families with children. However, keep in mind that older birds will produce meat that is tough and stringy and can only be eaten in stew. Among the most popular heritage breed meat chickens are the Rhode Island Red, Barred Rock, and Ameraucana. Another good choice is the Crested Cream Legbar, which produces beautiful blue eggs.

Heritage Breeds: Is the Cost Worth It?

Heritage Breeds: Is the Cost Worth It?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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