We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Backyard Chickens.

backyard-chicken-news-logo-500-x-500
Please Share With Your Friends and Family

Tapeworms Take a Toll on Chickens

By Tom Seest

What Are the Effects Of Tapeworms on Chickens?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

To survive and reproduce, tapeworms need a host called an intermediate host to produce their larvae. These intermediate hosts are commonly insects. Caged chickens are mainly infected by flies, but free-range birds are also susceptible to tapeworm infestation. Fly control can be helpful in eliminating the intermediate hosts from the flock, but it can be hard to eliminate them completely. To reduce the risk of chickens contracting tapeworms, you should limit chicken access to earthworms.

What Are the Effects Of Tapeworms on Chickens?

What Are the Effects Of Tapeworms on Chickens?

What Are the Signs of Tapeworms in Chickens?

Tapeworms are single-celled parasites that are carried by chickens and can also infect humans, pets, and livestock. They do not usually kill the host, but they can cause several negative effects on a chicken’s health. Some of the symptoms include dull feathers, decreased appetite, neurological signs, and lethargy. To treat tapeworms in chickens, you can use livestock or equine wormers.
The first sign of tapeworm infestation is undigested feed. As the worms grow, they can block the chicken’s digestive tract. The worms can remain dormant for several years. Tapeworms can also lead to decreased appetite, diarrhea, and weight loss. Some chickens will even show signs of anemia and blackheads. Once you’ve noticed these symptoms, you should contact a veterinarian to get an accurate diagnosis.
Chickens can have several different types of tapeworms. Some are small and easy to see, while others are large and can cause a lot of trouble. Tapeworms in chickens tend to affect young birds and can lead to lowered egg production. Tapeworms usually lodge in the scolex, which is a cavity in the bird’s body.
Once the tapeworms have matured, they pass through the intestines and lay eggs. These eggs are consumed by intermediate hosts, which include beetles, snails, grasshoppers, and even flies. Once the tapeworms reach the chicken’s digestive system, they release segments and start the life cycle all over again. The chicken will also lose weight and grow slowly.
Tapeworms in chickens can cause a wide range of symptoms, from irritability and unthriftiness to death. Treatment depends on the level of infection, but preventing infestation is the best way to ensure the health of your flock.

What Are the Signs of Tapeworms in Chickens?

What Are the Signs of Tapeworms in Chickens?

What are the Risks of Tapeworms for Chickens?

Transmission of tapeworms in chickens is possible through contact with infected chickens. Tapeworms in poultry are highly infectious and can cause many health problems. Heavy infections can lead to wasting away and lethargy in the infected birds. Infected poultry will also have mucous membranes that are thick, mucus-filled, and often fetid. They may also experience leg weakness.
A worm infestation in chickens can be a serious problem and can cause malnutrition. Worms also make chickens more susceptible to other infectious agents. Fortunately, worm treatment can be started at an early age and improve the health of your flock. Young chickens should receive levamisole, which stimulates the chicken’s immune system. Other treatments include ivermectin and moxidectin, which kill lice and mites.
Chickens may be infected with nematode worms, which inhabit the chicken digestive system. These worms can reach up to 8cm in length. Infected chickens will lose weight and produce pale eggs. The eggs of infected chickens may be pale or have a thin lining.
Histomoniasis can cause death in chickens. This parasite attacks chickens by entering the cecal cavity and reproducing rapidly. As the worms multiply in the cecal content, they enter the bloodstream, where they continue to reproduce. After infection, the worms can then move to the liver and cause the animal to die. However, the chicken may recover, and it is important to monitor infected chickens carefully to ensure the health of your flock.
Besides human exposure, chickens can also be infected by the parasites that live in soil and feed. The parasites can survive in soil and feed, and they are often transmitted to new hosts through contact with contaminated soil. This contamination also contains eggs of the cecal worms.

What are the Risks of Tapeworms for Chickens?

What are the Risks of Tapeworms for Chickens?

Can Chickens be Cured of Tapeworms?

Treatment of tapeworms in chickens requires a combination of methods. The first step is to ensure the chicken’s health and hygiene. A poor response to treatment may mean a more serious underlying condition. The second step is to ensure the feed is properly mixed with the drug. Treatment intervals are typically three to four weeks. Once the worm is under control, treatment intervals may be extended to eight to 10 weeks.
Treatment of tapeworms in chickens involves administering a worm-killing drug to the chicken. It is important to treat chickens at an early age to avoid malnutrition or other ill effects. The medication commonly recommended for young chickens is levamisole, which stimulates the chicken’s natural immunity. Other worm-killing drugs include moxidectin and ivermectin.
Treatment of tapeworms in chickens entails administering a worm-killing drug, such as Fenbendazole, to the chicken. After administering the medication, the affected area should be thoroughly cleaned. In some cases, moving the chickens and spraying insecticides may be necessary. Moreover, the bird’s access to infected droppings should be limited.
Symptoms of tapeworm infection can be identified by white crustiness on the beak or other parts of the chicken’s skin. In severe cases, a veterinary officer may prescribe oral medication called Moxidectin, to treat the parasites. The veterinary officer may also recommend treating the chicken’s feet with a petroleum jelly product. This can suffocate the parasites but may promote new scales.
Treatment of tapeworms in chickens can be a challenge for both the chicken and the owner. For most, it involves taking precautions and following a strict diet. However, if you notice your chicken not laying eggs or losing weight, it may be an indication that your chicken is infected.

Can Chickens be Cured of Tapeworms?

Can Chickens be Cured of Tapeworms?

Can Chickens be Cured of Tapeworms? intervals

Treatment intervals for tapeworms in chickens may vary according to the severity of the infestation and the time frame in which the worms are active. When a flock has a high infection pressure, treatment intervals should be shorter, generally three to four weeks. This will help reduce the number of eggs being shed and prevent recontamination of the environment. Once the infection pressure has been reduced, treatment intervals can be extended to every eight or ten weeks. Eventually, treatment intervals should be extended to every 10 to 12 weeks.
Infection with tapeworms in chickens can be a slow-moving, slow-growing worm that can cause significant damage to the digestive and respiratory systems. When present in large numbers, these worms can cause anemia, hemorrhaging, and death. In severe cases, chickens may show droopiness, emaciation, and diarrhea. If not treated properly, the infection can result in lethargy, weakened growth, and lowered carcass value. Turkeys are more susceptible to the disease than chickens.
Chickens can be infected by eggs of tapeworms in the soil. These worms can survive for several months in soil, where they will lay eggs that are easily infective to poultry. The eggs are easily introduced by human or animal contact and can be found on feed bags, footwear, and other items. Infected birds can excrete thousands of parasitic worm eggs each day. They have a low resistance to drugs and can be killed with fenbendazole.
The mites that cause these infections vary in severity and can affect any class of poultry. Some are blood-suckers, while others burrow into the skin or feathers. Some will even infect the internal organs of poultry. Mites can cause stunted growth, reduced egg production, reduced vitality, damaged plumage, and even death.

Can Chickens be Cured of Tapeworms? intervals

Can Chickens be Cured of Tapeworms? intervals

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


Please Share With Your Friends and Family