We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Backyard Chickens.

backyard-chicken-news-logo-500-x-500
Please Share With Your Friends and Family

Chickens and Capillary Worms: a Surprising Relationship

By Tom Seest

What Impact Do Capillary Worms Have on Chickens?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

The most common symptoms of capillary worm infection in chickens are swelling around the anus area and bumps on the backside. The affected chicken may also be scratched by its flock mates. Left untreated, the condition can lead to internal bleeding. The infection can also cause dehydration and discomfort.

What Impact Do Capillary Worms Have on Chickens?

What Impact Do Capillary Worms Have on Chickens?

What are Capillary Worms and How Do They Impact Chickens?

Capillary worms are a nematode and a member of the nematode family. There are several different species that can infest chickens, each infesting a specific part of the chicken’s body. These worms are commonly picked up by chickens when they eat earthworms or live in crowded conditions. Fenbendazole, ivermectin, and levamisole are treatments available for capillary worms. Other worms that can infest chickens include flukes, which are Trematoda parasites. Flukes are generally less common than other worms, but they can infect chickens if they come in contact with wild birds or eat snails.
If your chicken is exhibiting signs of worms, you should consider taking a stool sample to a veterinarian for a fecal float test. This test will help you determine the type of worms your chicken has, and can help you choose an appropriate treatment for your flock. Once you’ve identified which type of worm is affecting your flock, it is important to treat the entire flock. This is important because the worms in one bird can infect the other birds in its flock.
Capillary worms are tiny, segmented worms that are found in the digestive system of chickens. They can reach a length of 1.5 cm and are found mainly in the lower intestinal tract. They cause diarrhea, hemorrhage, and inflammation in chickens and may affect egg production. A highly infected chicken will often produce fewer eggs than other chickens.
Hairworms are another common parasite that can impact chickens. They are small, segmented worms that can be missed on a casual examination of the intestine. They require a microscope to diagnose. A similar worm, known as Capillaria cohtmbae, is common in pigeons but less commonly in mourning doves and other birds. It can be transmitted to uninfected birds by swallowing embryonated eggs.
When a chicken becomes infected with a worm, they will gasp for air and stretch their neck to breathe. Fortunately, the worms in chickens cannot be transmitted to humans. Because they are species-specific, chickens cannot be infected with human worms. However, when large numbers of worms infect the chicken’s digestive tract, they can overpopulate and cause disease. In some cases, this can lead to death. Worms are also responsible for several health problems in chickens, including anemia and hemorrhaging.

What are Capillary Worms and How Do They Impact Chickens?

What are Capillary Worms and How Do They Impact Chickens?

Can Capillary Worms Make Chickens Transparent?

Capillary worms are a type of parasitic worms that can be harmful to poultry. They are nearly invisible to the naked eye and are composed of multiple, flat sections that shed each day. Each section contains hundreds of eggs, and the whole tapeworm sheds millions of eggs over its lifetime. Capillary worms attach to different sections of the chicken’s digestive tract, and each species attaches to a different part using the four pairs of suckers on its head. Unlike other types of parasites, they require a host to complete their life cycle.
The most common and harmful worm to chickens is the large roundworm, which can reduce nutrient absorption and eventually lead to death. This type of worm is about the thickness of pencil lead, and can grow up to four and a half inches long. If infected, this worm can migrate up the reproductive tract to lay eggs, resulting in a blockage of the intestinal tract and death. Infected birds pass the worm’s eggs in their droppings, and these eggs are picked up by snails, earthworms, and grasshoppers.

Can Capillary Worms Make Chickens Transparent?

Can Capillary Worms Make Chickens Transparent?

Can Capillary Worms Block Chickens’ Intestines?

Capillary worms can live in different parts of a chicken’s body including the intestines. They are one of the tiniest types of worms. Because they are so small, they aren’t visible in the chicken’s stool. However, if a chicken is infected with this parasite, it can spread to other members of the flock.
Ascaridia galli is one of the most common worms that infect chickens. Symptoms of an infestation may include pale wattle and comb, and decreased appetite. In severe cases, the worm can even cause death. A chicken may also develop focal lesions in its intestinal tract, preventing defecation.
In addition to blocking the intestines, Capillary Worms can also cause hemorrhage. Once inside the chicken’s intestines, these worms can also cause poor feed absorption and growth. They can be transmitted directly from bird to bird, or indirectly through the ingesting of parasite eggs. Once inside, the worms can cause extensive damage within two weeks. This parasite can lead to severe inflammation, hemorrhage, and lining erosion in the intestines, leading to anemia and death.
Fortunately, there are some natural remedies that can help treat these worms. You can feed chickens a diet rich in coconut, which is known to be a natural dewormer. Also, bee propolis is an excellent antiseptic that promotes intestinal health. Bee propolis can be added to the feed for your hens or purchased as a tincture.
There are several species of Capillaria in poultry, including Capillary annulata and Capillary contorta. If you find your chickens suffering from these worms, you should take steps to treat them immediately. The best way to treat these worms is by treating them in a confined environment for three weeks.
Although worms can cause health problems in poultry, most don’t cause death. Moderate infections can cause diarrhea and emaciation in chickens. While “normal” worm loads are generally harmless, having some worms in the chickens’ digestive tracts helps generate a strong immune response.

Can Capillary Worms Block Chickens' Intestines?

Can Capillary Worms Block Chickens’ Intestines?

Can ACV Keep Chickens Safe from Capillary Worms?

ACV is an effective solution for the prevention of Capillary Worms. Often, the coop litter is fibrous and tough. These foods are difficult for the worms to digest and ferment, resulting in a sour crop. In addition, the worms can prevent the crop from emptying properly and alter the pH levels.
Capillary worms are small, thread-like worms that are not visible to the naked eye. Infested chickens may show a pale comb, a decreased appetite and diarrhea. In severe cases, the infestation could even lead to death. ACV can be mixed into feed or water to control the worms. The solution can be effective within 24 hours. Capillary worms are visible with a magnifying glass. The chickens ingest them when they eat earthworms or root through the litter.
ACV is a good choice for preventing worms in chickens. Worms in chickens can cause the chicken to be vulnerable to attacks from predators. ACV’s low pH is effective in killing germs and worms. It also helps raise barriers throughout the chicken’s body to prevent an outbreak.

Can ACV Keep Chickens Safe from Capillary Worms?

Can ACV Keep Chickens Safe from Capillary Worms?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.

 


Please Share With Your Friends and Family