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Uncovering the Secret to Egg-Laying Success In Your Backyard

By Tom Seest

What’s Stopping My Backyard Chickens From Laying Eggs?

At BackyardChickenNews, we help people who want to raise backyard chickens by collating information and news blended with our own personal experiences.

If your backyard chickens aren’t laying eggs anymore, you’re not alone. This common issue is caused by a number of different reasons. One of the most common is that the hen has started to eat her eggs. Another possible reason could be that she’s been attacked by a predator or has become overweight.

What's Stopping My Backyard Chickens From Laying Eggs?

What’s Stopping My Backyard Chickens From Laying Eggs?

Can Vitamin D Deficiency Impact My Chickens’ Egg Production?

If your backyard chickens are not laying eggs, it could be a vitamin D deficiency. Chickens can obtain vitamin D in two ways: through their feed and through exposure to direct sunlight. However, sunlight filtered through window glass is not effective at producing vitamin D in chickens. This is because glass doesn’t allow the ultraviolet rays of sunlight to reach the chicken’s skin.
Biotin deficiency in chickens is characterized by skin lesions on the feet, beak, and eyes. These areas are prone to dermatitis. Other signs of biotin deficiency are pyrosis and footpad dermatitis. This condition was first documented in Denmark in 1958 and became more common in the 1960s. It usually kills young chicks before they reach three weeks of age.
In some instances, a chicken may have a vitamin A deficiency without obvious signs. This may occur as early as seven days of age. When left untreated, a deficiency in vitamin A can lead to stunted growth and emaciation. It can also cause your chickens to lose the yellow pigment in their shanks and beaks.
A deficiency in Vitamin K can also lead to a variety of problems. For example, a severely deficient chick may bleed to death from a slight bruise. On the other hand, borderline deficiencies often result in small hemorrhagic blemishes on the breast, legs, wings, and abdomen. It may also lead to anemia as the bone marrow becomes hypoplastic.

Can Vitamin D Deficiency Impact My Chickens' Egg Production?

Can Vitamin D Deficiency Impact My Chickens’ Egg Production?

Is Your Calcium Deficiency Preventing Your Chickens from Laying Eggs?

If your backyard chickens are not laying eggs, the problem may be a calcium deficiency. It can occur in flocks that spend most of their day foraging for food. When your hens don’t get enough calcium from their feed, it will result in eggs with weak shells. A common way to correct this is to increase the calcium content of their food.
Calcium supplements are an easy way to improve the calcium content of your chicken’s diet. You can feed crushed oyster shells or other calcium-rich foods to your flock. Make sure to add them to your weekly feeding schedule. If you are unsure about what to feed your chickens, consult a veterinarian.
Calcium is essential to chicken health and egg production. A lack of it can result in a weak eggshell and weak bones. Calcium can be provided in many ways, including crushed oyster shells, which can be bought at your local feed store. Alternatively, you can feed your hens a diet that contains 4 percent calcium.
If your backyard chickens are not laying eggs, you should check them for calcium deficiency. The problem may also be caused by a bacterial infection or by an abnormal confirmation of the oviduct. In severe cases, a chicken will die within 48 hours if it is chronically egg-bound. If you suspect a calcium deficiency in backyard chickens, you can administer calcium to them through liquid vitamin supplements or electrolyte solutions.

Is Your Calcium Deficiency Preventing Your Chickens from Laying Eggs?

Is Your Calcium Deficiency Preventing Your Chickens from Laying Eggs?

What Can I Do to Protect My Chickens from Predators?

Predators may attack your backyard chickens if they aren’t laying eggs. Many predators, such as bobcats and red foxes, are common in many areas. Opossums are another common predator. Chickens have a small range of motion and are heavy, which can make them a good target for predators. Their sharp claws can also injure predators. However, it is important to keep these predators away from your flock.
The first clue that a predator may be attacking your chickens is the feathers. A hawk can rip off a chicken’s feathers and wings, leaving only its head and neck. Owls can also kill chickens and leave feathers as evidence. If you suspect a predator, you should search your backyard chicken coop for feathers and other traces of blood.
Other potential threats include raccoons, coyotes, foxes, and other predators. These animals often lurk around a chicken coop at night, so make sure your coop is secured. In addition, you need to check on your hens’ coop regularly for signs of predators.
Predators also prey on chicken eggs and baby chicks. They can also gnaw the legs of roosting birds. If you’re worried about a predator attack, consider installing a wire mesh chicken coop. This will help deter predators from landing on your coop. In addition, you can install a feeder and train your chickens to gather indoors at dusk.

What Can I Do to Protect My Chickens from Predators?

What Can I Do to Protect My Chickens from Predators?

Is Overweight Preventing Your Backyard Chickens from Laying Eggs?

If your backyard chickens haven’t been laying eggs, you may be wondering what is wrong with them. Fortunately, there are a few things that you can do to help get them to lay eggs. First, make sure that your chickens are getting enough exercise. You can do this by taking them for two daily walks. Second, make sure your chickens are getting a good diet. Chickens need a balance of carbohydrates and protein.
Another problem that could be causing your backyard chickens not to lay eggs is that they aren’t getting enough protein. This could cause them to become overweight, and that may result in a slowdown in egg production. To help your hens lay eggs, provide them with a high-quality layer of feed. Ideally, your backyard chickens will eat about half of their feed each day. Don’t overfeed them with treats; they should only be eating treats in the afternoon.
One reason why your backyard chickens may not be laying eggs is that they’re too old to lay eggs. This means that they won’t produce enough eggs to pay for their keeping. If this is the case, you can choose to keep them as pets or sell them. To make your backyard chickens healthier and save money, you can also try feeding them kitchen scraps or raising mealworms to reduce their feed bill.
Another problem that can affect the production of eggs is the weather. If you live in a hot climate, your chickens are more likely to stop laying eggs. The ideal temperature for laying eggs is 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. To compensate for this, make sure that your chickens have plenty of shade, proper ventilation in their coop, and plenty of water.

Is Overweight Preventing Your Backyard Chickens from Laying Eggs?

Is Overweight Preventing Your Backyard Chickens from Laying Eggs?

What Stress Factors Could Be Affecting My Backyard Chickens’ Egg Laying?

When backyard chickens don’t lay eggs, it may be due to a variety of factors, including heat, predators, and lack of protein. In addition, hens often don’t lay their eggs as often as they would like. A number of reasons could also be to blame, including illness, poor diet, or even external parasites.
Stress can be a big reason for chickens not laying eggs. Stress can cause them to become ill, go off feed, or lay eggs in strange locations. A chicken may also be stressed out because it has mites and lice. These bugs suck out the blood of the chicken, which can leave the chicken weak and anemic. Regardless of the cause, you’ll want to make sure that there’s no stress to your flock.
Stress can also be caused by changes in the environment. Changing nesting boxes, changing the nesting materials, or moving the flock from one location to another can all throw off a hen’s laying schedule. A change in the environment can also cause a drop in production. While you can’t always pinpoint the exact cause, it’s a good idea to conduct a complete history of your chickens, asking questions about feeding, housing, lighting, and droppings. You should also be sure to take a look for signs of predators or illness.
Some of the factors that can cause backyard chickens to stop laying eggs include noise and stress from dogs, kids, and other people. These factors can cause the chickens to stop laying their eggs and should be eliminated if you want your chickens to lay eggs again. Remember to check the coop and surrounding areas for signs of stress.

What Stress Factors Could Be Affecting My Backyard Chickens' Egg Laying?

What Stress Factors Could Be Affecting My Backyard Chickens’ Egg Laying?

Are My Backyard Chickens at Risk for Disease?

If your backyard chickens aren’t laying eggs, they may be suffering from a disease. Often, the first symptom of illness is the cessation of laying. Make sure you are regularly inspecting your flock to see if anything is wrong. You should also try to keep them as cool as possible. The ideal temperature for laying is between 50 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Any temperature above this will cause your hens to conserve energy and stop laying eggs. Keeping your flock cool will help prevent disease from spreading.
Changes to the nesting area can also cause a hen to stop laying eggs. Switching nesting materials or changing the nesting boxes can cause stress and a drop in production. If your hens are infected with some type of disease, you should isolate them and try to determine what caused the problem. In some cases, chickens will stop laying eggs after being attacked by a predator. It may take several weeks for a hen to recover from this stress.
Other causes of a hen’s lowered egg production can include parasites or disease. If you notice a significant drop in egg production, consult with your veterinarian for treatment. Some hens may simply be infected, but the best way to determine the cause of the drop in egg production is to check the hen’s health with a veterinarian.

Are My Backyard Chickens at Risk for Disease?

Are My Backyard Chickens at Risk for Disease?

Be sure to read our other related stories at BackyardChickenNews to learn more about raising chickens in your backyard.


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